Free and bound charge at dielectric-conductor interface

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Say I have a capacitor filled with a linear dielectric in a purely electrostatic setup. Then there will exist a uniform electric field inside the capacitor, and the field inside the electrodes is of course zero. The dielectric will polarize, and I should get bound charge at the dielectric-conductor interface. It seems to me that you would also get some induced free charge from the conductor as well at this interface.

What kind of coulomb forces would I get in this situation, if what I described is in fact correct?

To generalize my question, what in general happens at a conductor-dielectric interface? How does the induce charge behave? Is there only surface polarization charge from the dielectric, or does induced free charge come into play from the conductor?

Thanks!
 

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Dale
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Actually, you have it exactly backwards. There is an applied charge on the surface of the conductor that causes the E-field between the plates. The dielectric material polarizes in response to this externally applied E-field. For all practical purposes the dielectric is uncharged, including on its surface. Being polarized is not the same as being charged.
 

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