Gas molecular attraction in the sense of Newton's law

Therefore, most experiments focus on the gravitational force between larger masses, such as planets, stars, and galaxies. In summary, observations of astronomical phenomena and the theory of stars provide evidence for the attraction between atoms, molecules, and masses of gas in the sense of Newton's law. Experiments that directly measure the gravitational force between individual molecules are not currently feasible.
  • #1
Bernadette
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Attraction between gas
Hello

What experiment or observation shows that for atoms, molecules or masses of gas, there is attraction in the sense of Newton's law (universal attraction)?

Bernadette
 
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  • #2
Astronomical observations would indicate that the gases in nebulas stay together by gravity. Similarly for the sun composed largely of hydrogen atoms.
 
  • #3
The atmosphere exhibits all the predicted phenomena of gas under the influence of gravity. Density gradient, buoyancy of less dense gases and pockets of warmer air, the escape of hydrogen and helium from the atmosphere but not heavier gases, and more.

For evidence that gases generate gravity themselves and react to this gravity, astronomical phenomena are perfect examples, as jedishrfu pointed out.
 
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  • #4
Another example is the theory of stars, which are held together by gravity and hindered to collapse by pressure. For usual stars like our Sun Newtonian theory is sufficient. For, e.g., neutron stars you need general relativity (Tolman-Oppenheimer-Volkoff equation).
 
  • #5
The gravitational force between two molecules is too small to measure using existing technology.
 

Related to Gas molecular attraction in the sense of Newton's law

1. What is gas molecular attraction?

Gas molecular attraction refers to the force of attraction between molecules of a gas. This force is governed by Newton's law of universal gravitation, which states that all objects with mass attract each other with a force that is directly proportional to their masses and inversely proportional to the square of the distance between them.

2. How does Newton's law apply to gas molecular attraction?

According to Newton's law, the force of attraction between gas molecules is directly proportional to their masses. This means that molecules with larger masses will have a stronger attraction to each other than molecules with smaller masses. Additionally, the force of attraction decreases as the distance between molecules increases, following the inverse square law.

3. What factors affect gas molecular attraction?

The strength of gas molecular attraction can be affected by several factors, including the masses of the gas molecules, the distance between molecules, and the temperature and pressure of the gas. Generally, higher temperatures and lower pressures lead to weaker molecular attraction, while lower temperatures and higher pressures result in stronger attraction.

4. How does gas molecular attraction impact the behavior of gases?

The strength of gas molecular attraction plays a significant role in determining the behavior of gases. In gases with strong molecular attraction, such as water vapor, the molecules are more likely to stick together and form liquids or solids. In gases with weak molecular attraction, such as helium, the molecules are more likely to move freely and behave as ideal gases.

5. Can gas molecular attraction be measured?

Yes, gas molecular attraction can be measured using various techniques such as gas chromatography, mass spectrometry, and gas adsorption. These methods allow scientists to determine the strength of molecular attraction between gas molecules and provide valuable insights into the behavior of gases.

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