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Engineering Good Resources to learn Classical Thermodynamics

  1. Nov 7, 2015 #1
    Hi,
    I'm currently taking thermodynamics in second year mechanical engineering. I read previous threads on here about good textbooks, and everyone seemed to agree that Cengel's book is really good. Its the book we use in class, but at times I don't think it explains everything as fully as it could. Does anyone know of any other good resources. What about learnthermo.com? Is made by someone who has taught engineering for over 18 years, but I want to be sure that it is good before committing to it. Suggestions and opinions would be great. Thank you!
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Nov 8, 2015 #2
    Welcome to PF, sdobradomacaco!

    You can never go wrong with Çengel's, it is a great textbook. However, if you feel like you need another textbook you can try Introduction to Chemical Engineering Thermodynamics by Smith and Van Ness. Don't let the title deceive you, it is also suited for mechanical engineering majors.

    I've never used LearnThermo, so I don't know if it's good, but I prefer a textbook over any online resource, any day. But that's just my opinion.
     
  4. Nov 9, 2015 #3
    Thanks a lot for the advice. I'll be sure to look into that book for finals!
     
  5. Nov 10, 2015 #4
    What about Reif and Mandl?
     
  6. Nov 10, 2015 #5

    Geofleur

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    Basic Thermodynamics, by G. Carrington is a wonderful book. It introduces classical thermodynamics via a layered approach, each layer increasing in complexity with the book culminating in Gibbsian thermodynamics.
     
  7. Jan 21, 2016 #6
    My class is using the 8th edition by Moran, If I'm going to spend the money i want to get the best book to learn from for years to come. Would there be any issue with me skimping out and going with a cheaper, older, edition by cengel? If so which edition could I stand to buy?
     
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