Gravity affect on the motion of atoms ?

In summary: If you are not, I suggest you look them up. They are the remnants of supernovas and are very strange objects.
  • #1
Paul Anderson
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I was wondering if the run away gravity in a super massive black hole could cause a lock up of sorts, and stop (nearly) all atomic movement? Packing the matter at it's core so tightly, that it would paralyze it at an atomic level. Could this possibly mean that near the center of these monsters, it could actually be...cold?
Bringing things into the strange world of quantum mechanics and making the strange quantum states of mater and particles possible?
 
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  • #2
There is no "packing" at the core. Assuming the center is a singularity (=what General Relativity predicts) there are no atoms, or even individual particles any more. That also means the singularity itself does not have a temperature. The black hole as a whole object has one due to Hawking radiation, but that is a completely different thing.

If you are close to the event horizon of a black hole, but not falling in, all incoming light will be extremely blueshifted and will appear very hot to you.
If you are inside, you have to fall in, but blue-shifting can still happen.
 
  • #3
Firstly, atomic lattice structure is not compatible with the light cone structure theoretically predicted inside a black hole, and is thus forbidden by principle of causality. (Unless some new theory breaks this, such as a tesseract bookshelf at the singularity:-p)

Secondly, the light cone structure dictates that information from the singularity is never transmitted radially outwards and thus no observer away from singularity could obtain any information about it. Without information, the notion of entropy is meaningless and so is temperature.

*However, black hole does have entropy. This is a mostly unresolved problem and people like Leonard Susskind proposed holographic principle to cope with it. Although I am no expert on holograms, I would assume that does not contain any information on the singularity itself nevertheless. But this is too far beyond the topic of this thread.
 
  • #4
Are you familiar with neutron stars?
 
  • #5


I can provide some insight on the effect of gravity on the motion of atoms. Gravity is a fundamental force in the universe that affects all objects, including atoms. Atoms are constantly in motion due to the thermal energy they possess, and gravity plays a role in this motion.

In the case of a supermassive black hole, the intense gravitational pull can indeed affect the motion of atoms. The closer an object is to the black hole, the stronger the gravitational force it experiences. This can cause the atoms to move faster or slower, depending on their distance from the black hole.

However, it is unlikely that the gravity of a supermassive black hole would entirely stop atomic motion. The thermal energy of atoms is a very powerful force, and it would take an immense amount of gravity to completely immobilize them. Additionally, the extreme temperatures and pressures near the core of a black hole would also contribute to the movement of atoms.

As for the idea of "coldness" near the center of a black hole, it is important to note that temperature is a measure of the average kinetic energy of particles. In the extreme environment near a black hole, the concept of temperature as we know it may not apply. The laws of quantum mechanics would certainly play a significant role in this environment, but it is difficult to say for certain what effects they would have on atomic motion.

In conclusion, while the gravity of a supermassive black hole can certainly affect the motion of atoms, it is unlikely that it would completely stop atomic movement. The extreme conditions near a black hole bring us into the realm of quantum mechanics, but the exact implications on atomic motion are still not fully understood. Further research and experimentation are needed to fully understand the effects of gravity on the motion of atoms near supermassive black holes.
 

1. How does gravity affect the motion of atoms?

Gravity affects the motion of atoms by exerting a force on them, causing them to accelerate towards the center of the Earth. This acceleration due to gravity is the same for all objects, regardless of their mass.

2. Does gravity affect the motion of atoms in outer space?

Yes, gravity still affects the motion of atoms in outer space. Even though there may not be a significant gravitational force from a large celestial body, there is still a small amount of gravitational force between all objects in the universe.

3. How does gravity affect the motion of atoms in liquids and gases?

In liquids and gases, gravity affects the motion of atoms by causing them to move towards the bottom of the container. This is because the force of gravity is larger on the heavier atoms at the bottom, causing them to sink while the lighter atoms rise.

4. Can gravity change the speed of atoms?

Yes, gravity can change the speed of atoms. As atoms move towards the center of the Earth due to gravity, they gain kinetic energy and their speed increases. However, this change in speed is very small and not noticeable in everyday situations.

5. How does the strength of gravity affect the motion of atoms?

The strength of gravity affects the motion of atoms by determining the amount of force that is exerted on them. The stronger the gravitational force, the more acceleration and change in speed the atoms will experience. This is why objects on Earth, with a stronger gravitational force, tend to fall faster than objects in space, with a weaker gravitational force.

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