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Gripe, and a question electronics in appliances.

  1. Oct 7, 2009 #1

    turbo

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    I bought an Electrolux 30" gas range with IQ touch controls about 5 months ago. A couple of days ago, the clock display came up with missing segments and some half-on segments, and the oven light stopped coming on automatically when the door is opened. I told the controller to reset to factory defaults - no improvement. I shut off the breaker for about 15 minutes to try a "hard" reset - no improvement.

    I called the seller asking for service, and he told me that the clock module interfaces with every control in the stove and that it probably got hit with a power surge. Then he said (as if I should have known about this problem) that I should have plugged the range into a surge-suppressor. Apart from the obvious question of why he didn't tell me that when I bought the range AND the fact that there is no such recommendation in the Installation or Use manuals comes the most important question. Electrolux must know from their warranty-service records that such failures are common. Why, oh, why didn't they design a surge-suppressor (and perhaps a fast-acting breaker) into every range with this problem? Such components are dirt cheap and would save money in parts and service. Anybody here got a ballpark figure on the cost of installing these components during the manufacturing of these ranges? BTW, the range was $2000.
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Oct 7, 2009 #2
    It's also possible that the adhesive compound holding the LCD together is losing grip. I fixed a couple of LCD displays by heating its back side with a blow dryer, and used some black insulation tape to press it against the board.
     
  4. Oct 7, 2009 #3

    turbo

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    Sorry, I should have specified that it is a lighted display - possibly plasma.
     
  5. Oct 7, 2009 #4

    jambaugh

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    turbo-1,
    Your range should still be under warranty. I suggest you write a physical letter to the seller asking for service with a copy to the manufacturer. Letters are far more effective than phone conversations at getting action since they constitute official notice and permanent dated record of the communication. In the letter you should also refer to your earlier phone conversation to get it also a matter of record.

    The seller can say what he likes but he cannot deny your warranty if as you say the installation complies with the provided instructions.
     
  6. Oct 7, 2009 #5

    turbo

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    The seller indicated that he would get replacement parts in and schedule service, so I think the warranty issue won't be a problem. My concern is that if the electronic controls are so delicate, why not install MOVs (in an easily replaceable module) to protect against surges? Maybe a few bucks tops to protect a $2000+ range...

    If I get no action in a day or two, I certainly will write a letter and will complain to the manufacturer, as well, regarding the quality (or lack of) of their "authorized service." When sellers drag their feet on service, my procedure is a letter, a certified letter with a request for receipt, then a letter to the AG's office with a copy to the seller.
     
  7. Oct 7, 2009 #6
    That's assuming the problem was caused by a surge. There is many other variables to consider. I doubt you could diagnose such a problem over the phone, unless the guy is getting many phone calls from different customers complaining about the same thing.

    Another possibility is poor quality control. During the manufacturing process, someone wasn't wearing a grounding band, and touched some of the circuitry.
     
  8. Oct 7, 2009 #7

    turbo

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    You're right - there could have been a quality issue just waiting to show itself. The fact that he jumped on the "surge" explanation so quickly leads me to believe that Electrolux and its dealers have experienced enough similar failures to make it a likely culprit.
     
  9. Oct 7, 2009 #8

    berkeman

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    Does the oven have a CE mark sticker on the back, or language about having a CE mark in the manual? If so, it should have been tested to EN 61000-4-5 surge immunity standards, and should have at least a basic level of immunity. Do you get much lightning in your neck of the woods?
     
  10. Oct 7, 2009 #9

    turbo

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    We haven't had any lightning recently. The manuals and spec sheets don't mention a CE certification, and since the oven is cooking our supper right now, dragging it out is not convenient - ouch!
     
  11. Oct 7, 2009 #10

    turbo

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    I just called Electrolux and was told that the salesman was mistaken. There is built-in surge protection, and it is not necessary that I plug the range into another surge protector. The lady on the help-line could not tell me what level of surge protection is built-in, but she offered to ship me a timer module and send me a list of approved repair-people that can do warranty work.

    Her tech guy said no further protection is necessary as long as the outlet is protected by a circuit-breaker.
     
  12. Oct 7, 2009 #11
    When the repair crew comes over, have Duke keep an eye on them.
     
  13. Oct 7, 2009 #12

    turbo

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    Woof!

    He is an impressive-looking dog, but as gentle as a lamb.
     
  14. Oct 7, 2009 #13

    Integral

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    Where would you even buy a surge suppressor to plug 230VAC into? I have never heard of one.

    I have had a electronic Maytag range for about 10yrs. We bought it off the show room floor, for display purposes they had shorted 2 legs of the power connector allowing them to plug in 120VAC and run the display with no power to any of the elements. Someone neglected to remove the jumper when they pulled the range off the showroom floor and shipped it to our house. I watched as the delivery people unloaded the range and connected the pigtail, I also observed the jumper across 2 legs of the power. I just assumed that the delivery men knew what they were doing and said nothing. When they plugged into the house and the main breaker tripped I was the only one not surprised. They were pretty much dumbfounded and had no idea what the problem was. When I went and got my Multimeter and they had no idea what it was, or that the fact that 2 of the power legs where shorted was a bad thing I revised my estimation that they knew what they were doing. After I had them remove the jumper from the power it worked fine. For a while!

    First we had to replace the temperature sensors, then due the flaky construction had to replace the display board, which is actually the "computer" which runs everything.
    Since then we have had to replace the computer twice. I have been doing the work without calling in a Sears repairman, since it seems they did more damage then good.

    My experiences with this range as made me resolve never to buy anything made by Maytag that does not have a spin cycle.
     
  15. Oct 7, 2009 #14

    turbo

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    The range needs only 120V because it is gas cook-top and gas convection oven with a 120V warming oven and low consumption electronic controls. Still I felt that there should be no need to buy a surge-protector for a properly designed appliance. I felt pretty good about the features and build-quality of this range until I got into their help system and was told to indicate whether my question was about a Frigidaire or an Electrolux appliance! We have a Frigidaire front-loading washer and matching dryer. The washer doesn't make balance corrections and tries to shake the house apart and the drier snags and rips off straps - even heavy straps on my wife's corduroy overalls. I hate Frigidaire!!
     
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