High Temperature Experiment set-up

  • Thread starter dpage
  • Start date
  • #1
6
0
I need to test a sodium wicking system in high temperature and agitated conditions. The experiment setup seems like it is going to be pretty complicated, however, and I need some direction on where I might get a glass set-up that I could modify. The set-up is as follows:

Solid sodium pellets are placed in a glass test tube, thermally rated for up to 400 deg. C..

Oxygen is purged from the tube (argon or another inert gas introduced), and the tube is sealed (cap needs to be thermally rated for 400 C as well.)

In order to create a safety barrier between the sodium tube and the oxygen atmosphere (in the event that the tube cracks under high temperatures), The sealed sodium tube is placed inside a larger glass tube which is then filled with argon.

We now have a tube within a tube where no oxygen is present. The trick is that the sodium tube needs to be agitated. We have access to a shaking mechanism that would agitate the outer tube, but the sodium tube needs to be secured inside the outer tube. Therefore, I need a set-up with a tube inside a tube so that the inner tube is secured firmly to the outer tube.

My question is: Is there a similar type of glass set-up available to purchase that I may be able to modify? Any input on how I might do it and where I might find the necessary materials? If I can't find something I may have to construct it from scratch which will prove difficult (especially to hold up under high temperatures).

Thanks,
Dpage
 

Answers and Replies

  • #2
Gokul43201
Staff Emeritus
Science Advisor
Gold Member
7,083
18
Sealed tube reactions are fairly common in certain areas of organic and inorganic chemistry. I haven't personally done any in over a decade, and can't recall the details of the process. But I think anyone reasonably active in say, solid state chemistry, can show you how to make sealed tubes. I think the common tube materials are quartz and fused-silica. These are generally rated for temperatures far above 400C.
 
  • #3
uby
176
0
do you have to use glass for any particular reason? why not use a metal container? many (most?) metals have negligible interactions with alkali/alkaline elements especially at low temperatures.

i'd be concerned over the interaction of Na with SiO2 to produce very low melting soda glass.
 
  • #4
6
0
Thanks for the input. I was thinking glass because we need to be able to observe the experiment, but you're right, oxides are not a good idea. Would quartz be OK? Also thanks for the direction on sealed tube experiments...that led to some good research...
 
  • #5
uby
176
0
with regards to the need to observe: you can always use a welded pipe as your reaction vessel and attach viewports for observation. you can also easily modify a pipe flange to incorporate whatever stirring apparatus you desire.
 

Related Threads on High Temperature Experiment set-up

Replies
3
Views
1K
Replies
11
Views
1K
  • Last Post
Replies
2
Views
11K
  • Last Post
Replies
1
Views
2K
  • Last Post
Replies
2
Views
5K
  • Last Post
Replies
8
Views
6K
  • Last Post
Replies
3
Views
4K
  • Last Post
Replies
6
Views
4K
Replies
2
Views
2K
Top