How can I solve a coupled PDE and ODE using the method of lines?

In summary: If so, since you are taking the partial against x and t you can assume the function is C(x,t). Which case gives this relation:dC = \frac{∂C}{∂x}dx + \frac{∂C}{∂t}dtSo assuming k2 is non-zero, you have dC/dx = [k1*k3/k2]*CThe solution to this is the standard exponential as in the ODE case, only your constant is now a function of time.
  • #1
thereisnospoo
5
0
I am trying to solve an ODE and PDE and I am having problems coming up with a method for doing so.

The PDE is:

k1*(dC/dt) = k2*(dC/dx)

But I have an ODE that is an expression for dC/dt:

dC/dt = k3*C

Where k1,k2 and k3 are constants.

I planned to use the method of lines to get a solution where C changes with t and x. However, I am having problems dealing with the dC/dt ODE expression. I can use method of lines only on the 1st equation, but that would not take the relationship of the second equation into consideration. If I plug the ODE equation into the PDE, then I will lose the "time" variable.

Anyone have any suggestions or tips?
 
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  • #2
The ODE looks like a separable equation. Can't you use its solution and substitute into the first equation?
 
  • #3
I'm assuming for your PDE you mean both as partial derivatives and for the ODE you mean total derivative?

In which case (writing D for total derivative and d for partial),

the ODE gives you: DC/Dt = dC/dt + [dC/dx][dx/dt]

Further, you know dC/dx in terms of dC/dt from the PDE, and you can plug that into get:

[1 + k1/k2][dC/dt] = k3*C

and this is a PDE you can solve :)

(Also, there's the special case when k2 is zero!)
 
  • #4
Marioeden said:
I'm assuming for your PDE you mean both as partial derivatives and for the ODE you mean total derivative?

In which case (writing D for total derivative and d for partial),

the ODE gives you: DC/Dt = dC/dt + [dC/dx][dx/dt]

Further, you know dC/dx in terms of dC/dt from the PDE, and you can plug that into get:

[1 + k1/k2][dC/dt] = k3*C

and this is a PDE you can solve :)

(Also, there's the special case when k2 is zero!)

Thanks for the reply!

I actually meant that the 2nd equation is a partial derivative as well, which is why I think I'm running into my problem. do you have any insight into what I can do next?
 
  • #5
thereisnospoo said:
Thanks for the reply!

I actually meant that the 2nd equation is a partial derivative as well, which is why I think I'm running into my problem. do you have any insight into what I can do next?

Oh, if the second one is partial as well then substitute it into the first one.

So assuming k2 is non-zero, you have dC/dx = [k1*k3/k2]*C

The solution to this is the standard exponential as in the ODE case, only your constant is now a function of time.

Then just plug this back into the original equations to check for consistency
 
  • #6
There seems to be some confusion with ODE and PDE. Are you trying to solve for C? If you just plug the second eqn. one into the first you won't get the most general solution.

If so, since you are taking the partial against x and t you can assume the function is C(x,t).
Which case gives this relation:

dC = [itex]\frac{∂C}{∂x}[/itex]dx + [itex]\frac{∂C}{∂t}[/itex]dt

Now, you can plug in those two equations, and solve like an ODE to get the answer. And when you integrate don't forget a constant!
 

Related to How can I solve a coupled PDE and ODE using the method of lines?

1. What is the difference between a coupled PDE and ODE?

A coupled PDE (partial differential equation) is a mathematical equation that involves multiple independent variables and their partial derivatives, while an ODE (ordinary differential equation) involves a single independent variable and its derivatives.

2. What is the importance of solving coupled PDE and ODE equations?

Solving coupled PDE and ODE equations is crucial in many fields of science and engineering, as they can accurately model complex systems and phenomena such as fluid dynamics, heat transfer, and chemical reactions. By solving these equations, we can gain a better understanding of these processes and make predictions for real-world applications.

3. What are some common methods for solving coupled PDE and ODE equations?

Some common methods for solving coupled PDE and ODE equations include separation of variables, finite difference methods, finite element methods, and numerical methods such as Runge-Kutta and Euler's method.

4. How do boundary conditions and initial conditions affect the solution of coupled PDE and ODE equations?

Boundary conditions define the behavior of the solution at the boundaries of the system, while initial conditions specify the solution at a particular time or location. These conditions are crucial for solving coupled PDE and ODE equations, as they help to uniquely determine the solution and ensure it is physically meaningful.

5. What are some challenges of solving coupled PDE and ODE equations?

Solving coupled PDE and ODE equations can be computationally demanding and may require specialized software or programming skills. Additionally, finding an analytical solution for these equations can be challenging and may require approximations or numerical methods. It is also important to carefully choose appropriate boundary and initial conditions to obtain accurate results.

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