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I How can we distinguish classical physics and modern physics?

  1. Mar 24, 2016 #1
    How to decide whether a particular topic is studied in classical physics or modern physics?
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Mar 24, 2016 #2

    PeroK

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    Who cares?
     
  4. Mar 24, 2016 #3
    What do you mean by it?
     
  5. Mar 24, 2016 #4

    DrClaude

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    Why does it matter what classification is given to a topic?
     
  6. Mar 24, 2016 #5

    russ_watters

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    Typically, they are studied in an order or grouping determined by the college's plan of study, and how to classify them isn't really a relevant issue.
     
  7. Mar 24, 2016 #6
    I actually wanted to know what are the different branches of classical physics and modern physics.
     
  8. Mar 24, 2016 #7

    PeroK

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    Who says classical physics can't be modern?
     
  9. Mar 24, 2016 #8
    The term "Modern" Physics may be specific to US and Canada.
    It is more like an academic term (used as a course name in college).
    Includes mainly relativity and "quantum physics" (which may not be the same as quantum mechanics proper but rather atomic and nuclear physics). I suppose includes the physics advances made after about 1900.
     
  10. Mar 24, 2016 #9
    Modern physics is used as the title for the first year quantum mechanics and special relativity course at some universities in the UK also.
     
  11. Mar 24, 2016 #10

    russ_watters

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    Ultimately, I think what the collective answers here are telling you is that these questions don't have a lot of meaning. The level of organization of topics you are suggesting you want to know about doesn't really exist.
     
  12. Mar 25, 2016 #11
    Oh.. Okay! Thank you
     
  13. Mar 25, 2016 #12
    Yes you are right.
     
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