How Do I Solve This Combination Circuit?

In summary, you added the series resistors 10k, 20k, and 30k in parallel to get the desired value of 62k.
  • #1
atoms
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Could somebody help me out with this combination circuit? The answer that I get is 62K but that is not one of the answers. At first, I thought the 10kohm and 20kohm wherein series and the other side as well. Then I thought they are all in parallel because of the different current flow they all can take but I couldn't figure out the answer. Any help will be appreciated.

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  • #2
So show how you did it.

I did the parallel resistors to get a single value.
Then added the series resistance.
Then the one in parallel.
Then added the two series resistances.

They've made the values all work out easily. There are no difficult sums. You could probably do it in your head, but better write it down for checking.
 
  • #3
Merlin3189 said:
So show how you did it.

I did the parallel resistors to get a single value.
Then added the series resistance.
Then the one in parallel.
Then added the two series resistances.

They've made the values all work out easily. There are no difficult sums. You could probably do it in your head, but better write it down for checking.

So from what you are saying is getting the 24k,24k,40k,and 60k in parallel getting 8k then adding the 22k and 2k which would be 32k. Finding the parallel of the 32k with the 20k and getting 12k, adding the 10k which would be 22 and still not getting the right answer.
 
  • #4
atoms said:
So from what you are saying is getting the 24k,24k,40k,and 60k in parallel getting 8k Yes
then adding the 22k and 2k which would be 30k. No. First, 8+22+2 = 32. But you can't add all three yet. So keep one for later.
Finding the parallel of the 30k with the 20k and getting 12k, Yes
adding the 10k which would be 22 Yes
and still not getting the right answer. Only 3 out of 4 yeses
resistors_reduction2.png

BTW. You haven't shown how you got 62k yet
 

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  • #5
Merlin3189 said:
View attachment 232555
BTW. You haven't shown how you got 62k yet
So the outer resisitors I add at the end once I calculate the inside. Thank you
 
  • #6
I added the 32 from the bottom and the 30 on top which was terribly wrong
 
  • #7
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  • #8

Related to How Do I Solve This Combination Circuit?

1. What is a combination circuit?

A combination circuit is a type of electrical circuit that contains both series and parallel components. This means that some components are connected in a series, while others are connected in parallel.

2. How does a combination circuit work?

A combination circuit works by allowing the flow of electric current through multiple paths. The series components have the same current passing through them, while the parallel components have the same voltage across them.

3. What are the advantages of a combination circuit?

Combination circuits have the advantage of being able to handle high voltages and currents, as well as providing different pathways for current flow. They also allow for a wide range of design options and can be used in various applications.

4. What are the disadvantages of a combination circuit?

One of the main disadvantages of a combination circuit is that they can be more complex and difficult to design compared to other types of circuits. They also require more components and can be more expensive to build.

5. How do I calculate the total resistance in a combination circuit?

To calculate the total resistance in a combination circuit, you need to first calculate the individual resistances of each component. For series components, you simply add the resistances together. For parallel components, you can use the formula 1/R_total = 1/R1 + 1/R2 + 1/R3... Once you have the individual resistances, you can add them together to get the total resistance of the circuit.

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