How Do You Calculate Gain and Cutoff Frequency in a Switched Capacitor Circuit?

In summary, the conversation discusses a low pass filter gain equivalent circuit with a Capacitor in feedback and two resistors. The speaker is unsure of how to find the resistors but suggests using the equation Req = 1/C*f. They also mention the low frequency gain formula A = -R2/R1 and the calculation for fo = 1/2*pi*R2*C1. They ask for someone to verify their logic and help with their assignment, which is due soon.
  • #1
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To start: I believe this is a low pass filter gain equivalent circuit, with Capacitor in feedback with two resistors.

To find the resistors I wasnt really sure but I found something in my textbook Req = 1/C*f, so could I use the two separate capacitors and frequency switches to calculate the equivalent resistances?

So the low frequency gain would be A = -R2/R1, where R2 and R1 would be the equivalent resistances based on the capacitors and frequency.

And fo = 1/2*pi*R2*C1 ??

Could someone please check this logic over and get back to me. My assignment is due SOON!
 
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  • #2
any help please?
 
  • #3
please any help?!
 
  • #4
help?
 
  • #5
anyone please help assignment due
 
  • #6
any input guys? id deeply appreciate it
 

Related to How Do You Calculate Gain and Cutoff Frequency in a Switched Capacitor Circuit?

1. What is a switched capacitor circuit and how does it work?

A switched capacitor circuit is an electronic circuit that uses capacitors and switches to perform various functions such as amplification, filtering, and signal processing. It works by periodically switching the capacitors between different configurations, which allows for the transfer of charge and the manipulation of signals.

2. What are the advantages of using a switched capacitor circuit?

Some advantages of switched capacitor circuits include high precision and stability, low cost, and the ability to integrate multiple functions onto a single chip. They also have low power consumption and can operate at high frequencies.

3. How does a switched capacitor circuit differ from traditional analog circuits?

In traditional analog circuits, resistors and inductors are used to manipulate signals, while switched capacitor circuits use capacitors and switches. This allows for more precise control over the signal and reduces the need for external components.

4. What are some common applications of switched capacitor circuits?

Switched capacitor circuits can be found in a variety of electronic devices, including audio amplifiers, voltage converters, and data converters. They are also used in digital signal processing, power management, and sensor circuits.

5. Are there any limitations or drawbacks to using switched capacitor circuits?

One potential limitation of switched capacitor circuits is the limited range of capacitance values that can be achieved compared to traditional analog circuits. They also require careful design and layout to minimize noise and other unwanted effects. Additionally, their performance can be affected by changes in temperature and other environmental factors.

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