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I How exactly are X-Rays produced?

  1. Jan 21, 2017 #1
    I found that in a cathode ray tube accelerated Electrons produce X rays! Now it can be in 3 ways
    1) When the electrons are being accelerated by increasing Voltage...then according classical theoy they should radiate energy! It may be the X ray
    2) When it reaches the metal plate there will be the acceleration due to nucleus, it may produce X rays, which we call Bremsstrahlung
    3) If the electron strike another electron and seize it's place then its energy also converts into X ray!
    Pls help me where am I wrong in my concept????
     

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  3. Jan 22, 2017 #2

    Dale

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    Your 2) and 3) both happen. In 1) the acceleration is comparatively quite gentle, so any radiation would be far below the x ray range. Also, it is accelerating so I would think it would be absorbing radiation rather than emitting it, but I am not sure about that point.
     
  4. Jan 22, 2017 #3

    ZapperZ

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    Actually, it is not "acceleration", but rather deceleration. Bremsstrahlung is "braking radiation", i.e. while it is slowing down.

    Again, a bit inaccurate. It has to be one of the "core level" electrons in the atom, some time called the K-shell or deeper. It doesn't seize its place, but rather knocks it out of place. Then, this state is empty, the other electrons in the atoms will decay down to this state, emitting EM radiation. Due to the nature of the transition into this state, this is when x-ray is emitted.

    You may want to refer to this:

    http://hyperphysics.phy-astr.gsu.edu/hbase/quantum/xrayc.html

    Zz.
     
    Last edited: Jan 22, 2017
  5. Jan 23, 2017 #4

    davenn

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    an accelerating electron emits EM ... standard for an AC ( RF) circuit :smile:
     
  6. Jan 23, 2017 #5

    ORF

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    Hello

    In classical electrodynamics, if acceleration is not zero, it will emit em waves (independently on the sign of the acceleration).

    In a particle accelerator (specifically betatron, synchrotron, and similar), they loss a lot of energy while trying to give more energy (momentum) to the particles.
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Synchrotron#Principle_of_operation

    Greetings.
     
    Last edited: Jan 23, 2017
  7. Jan 23, 2017 #6

    ZapperZ

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    I don't want to be picky, but what you wrote and what you quoted from Wikipedia do not match.

    "Bremsstralung" happens when a charged particle is decelerated very quickly. This happens in, say, when a charge particle is stopped by a piece of material. This is a major issue in shielding for particle accelerators.

    The loss of energy in synchrotron, betatron, cyclotron is due to the BENDING of the path of the charged particles, which is a form of acceleration. There is no loss in kinetic energy of the charged particles. This is, technically, not usually categorized as Bremsstralung radiation.

    Zz.
     
  8. Jan 23, 2017 #7

    ORF

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    Hello

    Sorry, you are right. Thank you for the clarification [I have removed the reference to bremsstrahlung]

    Greetings.
     
    Last edited: Jan 23, 2017
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