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How is a memristor different from a resistor

  1. Jun 21, 2015 #1
    I read that the memristor is described by the equation dφ=Mdq. If both sides are divided by dt, then dφ/dt=Mdq/dt.
    But dφ/dt=V and dq/dt=I. Then V=MI which is ohm's law. Isn't the constant M just the same as resistance?
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Jun 21, 2015 #2

    mfb

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    M is a function of charge flown (and therefore a function of time as well), that is the point of the memristor. A resistor would have a constant M.

    (Mdq)/dt is not the same as M(dq/dt).
     
  4. Jun 21, 2015 #3
    So M is not a constant unlike R, L, and C? I read that the memristor was predicted due to the symmetry of the equations for R, L and C. If M is not constant with respect to time, doesn't that make the memristor the odd one out o the four, so that there is still no symmetry?
     
  5. Jun 21, 2015 #4

    mfb

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    M is not the constant. The constant is how M changes with charge, in the similar way as the voltage at a capacitor changes with charge.
     
  6. Jun 22, 2015 #5
    In this 1971 paper by Leon O. Chua, you can find the formulae spelt out (p. 511)

    www.cpmt.org/scv/meetings/chua.pdf
     
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