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How is the mechanical energy of a generator transformed into electrical energy?

  1. Aug 2, 2008 #1
    I always thought that an electrode is what transforms the mechanical energy of a generator into electrical energy.

    In a children's book about technology that I was reading yesterday, I saw something that has confused me. The book seemed to imply that the movement of a the wires of a coil through a magnetic field created or increased the electricity in the wires. It makes sense to me that the movement of wires through a magnetic field could increase the power of the electricity, but I don't understand how the movement of wires through a magnetic field could create electricity in the first place if there was no electricity in the wires before.

    How is the mechanical energy of a generator transformed into electrical energy?
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Aug 2, 2008 #2

    russ_watters

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    Staff: Mentor

    That book you read has it right. Moving a wire through a magnetic field drives a current.
    The wires are filled with electrons just sitting there waiting to be moved.
     
  4. Aug 2, 2008 #3
    Most people would have just said that and left it at that, and I would still be confused.


    Aha! Now I understand. I needed someone to explain it on the atomic level like you did. I appreciate it.
     
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