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Job Skills How much do companies care about people's age?

  1. Nov 20, 2017 #1
    Hi
    How much companies that hires people with a degree care about their age?
    Considering that two person has bot no experience for the work, a company prefer to hire younger people, or they care more about the skills a person have?

    Thanks.
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Nov 20, 2017 #2

    phinds

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    Depends entirely on the situation. I can't imagine that there is any hard and fast rule but there is likely some preference for a skilled person but they may want an entry level person for two reasons. First, less pay, and second so they can train them from scratch.
     
  4. Nov 20, 2017 #3
    I mean, there are problem if a person get the degree in 5 years instead of 4?

    P.S In my country only 20% of students get the degree in time.
     
  5. Nov 20, 2017 #4
    I can't imagine 1 year making a difference to anyone. Your question usually comes in the context of say a 21-yr old grad vs a 40-yr old grad (didn't go to a university when he was younger, but later in life has decided to).
     
  6. Nov 21, 2017 #5
    In intended to make a difference between a person that graduated in time, vs someone that needed more years to take the degree.
     
  7. Nov 21, 2017 #6

    Choppy

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    In my experience, there is no perceptible difference in terms of competitiveness for positions. There are a lot of reasons someone might spend an extra year or two on their education... illness, a need to work part-time to pay for it, figuring out what to major in, doing volunteer work on the side, spending time travelling abroad... most of them have absolutely nothing to do with how fit an individual is for a given position.

    There's no competitive advantage in finishing early.

    As CrysPhys said, there may be concerns for people who are trying to enter certain industries with very large age differences. But even then someone who is in his or her forties and competing against twenty-somethings will also have advantages that can be marketed such as maturity and life-experience, qualities that many employers will covet.
     
  8. Nov 21, 2017 #7
    (1) A one year difference would hardly be noticeable on a resume. A substantially larger discrepancy would raise a red flag. If there is a substantial discrepancy, then the key issue is whether you have a good reason to explain why.

    (2) If the employer is in Italy, then 5 yrs would be expected according to your info, correct?

    (3) The typical length of time to a get a degree (high-school, bachelor's, ....) varies from country to country. If the employer is not in Italy, he would probably figure, "Hey, that's Italy."
     
  9. Nov 21, 2017 #8
    I made a mistake, I didn't said that in italy we have a bachelor's degree of 3 years and a master degree of 2 years.
    I've heard the minister of Education that says is very important to get a degree as fast as possible and losing a year can be a dramma.
    In Italy we can make the same exam more then once if you don't like the score you made.
    Many people prefer to do that to get a more high mark, or prefer to do only few exam instead of all, to concentrate on them, this because many company ask a score to hire you.

    https://media.licdn.com/media-proxy/ext?w=800&h=800&hash=u7LQo62ShfCsJjs5JW4WyBN78ME=&ora=1,aFBCTXdkRmpGL2lvQUFBPQ,xAVta9Er0Vinkhwfjw8177yE41y87UNCVordEGXyD3u0qYrdf3PrcJOLcLWnuQwReXkclAA0LfKgQTCzD5G_fdu5fNlw2pLgco27dA4BYBI3iSdF_NQ8
    Here a person ask ( pieni voti) that means the height possible mark that in Italy is 110 with magna cum laude in Civil Engineering, that is 5 GPA in USA I suppose, know how to speak german and english, be able to work abroad when your boss want, a job that is available only for 6 months, for 600 euros....and to survive in Italy you need at least 1000 euros.

    You can make more money at McDonald, I think.
     
  10. Nov 23, 2017 #9

    symbolipoint

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    Age really does matter, although we do not want it to matter. With age comes years of experience and an expectation (usually) of higher pay-rate. Unfortunately, with age also comes shorter time until retirement, higher probability of illness or death and more family responsibilities. Employers may often try to discriminate about age because they wish to pay less, not more; and they want the employee to endure with the company for a while. At the same time, an older job-seeker may really want to accept lower pay because he may have been unemployed for a long time - but this often comes with having less experience because of having been unemployed for some time.

    Decision to change CAREERS? Sometimes this makes things worse!
     
  11. Nov 23, 2017 #10
    This is very different to what was wrote in the first replies.
    Which is the truth?
     
  12. Nov 23, 2017 #11

    mathwonk

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    Symbolipoint is correct in my experience. Shortly after retirement I responded, with brief vita including birth date, to an advertised tenure track position for a researcher/teacher in my area at a local college. Although I was likely among the most qualified applicants by experience and accomplishment, conceivably the most, I was told by return email that no position was currently open to me. This in spite of one being openly advertised online. They apparently wanted only a younger person, who as suggested above, would command lower pay, and serve longer, in spite of the use of such criteria in hiring being against federal law. I might have pointed this out to them but was so discouraged I just stopped looking for work. Happily I was subsequently recruited as a teacher-tutor of the gifted, because of my visibility online, by someone who valued age and experience, but at much lower pay, although with greater job satisfaction and appreciation.

    Years ago I experienced this from the opposite perspective. As a young man in my 20's I was hired at minimum salary by a local state college math dept. Within two years they had forced out two much more experienced and well qualified (and higher paid) men in their 50's or 60's. When I asked a friend why they had let such good men go, I was told it was partly to be able to keep me. My friend had reluctantly agreed to let them go but said they had been given an administrative directive to cut someone and otherwise it would have been me, the young energetic and cheap guy. Fortunately for me I was later also forced out (for lack of a PhD), and obliged to get my PhD and find a much more fulfilling job at a better school. (The price was several more years of struggle in poverty and with a family to feed.) Prior to tenure, academic jobs in the US are extremely competitive, although with the retirement of the baby boomers that may change somewhat.
     
    Last edited: Nov 23, 2017
  13. Nov 23, 2017 #12
    Be very careful of any conclusions you draw from responses here. You worded the question title improperly. As I discussed earlier, a difference of a year or two between two candidates won't make any difference. A difference of 20 years or so will.
     
  14. Nov 23, 2017 #13
    I hope this is true, I hope companies don't care to hire a persone because is 26 instead of 25 or 24.
     
  15. Nov 23, 2017 #14

    mathwonk

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    Indeed, a 26 year old candidate who spent two years on a prestigious postdoc, is more attractive as a potential hire than a 24 year old without such experience. Even a very accomplished 60 year old is probably less appealing than a promising 30 year old.
     
  16. Nov 23, 2017 #15
    Again, this thread is getting confounded with issues of age per se, years of experience, and taking too long to finish a degree.
     
  17. Nov 24, 2017 #16

    symbolipoint

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    Yes; but they will sometimes be related. A good thing to do, is once earning a degree (bachelor's degree), get a job, and keep working. Interruptions to employment become a bigger increasing risk as the length of unemployment or the number of unemployment periods increase. Still, for people who maintained longer employment may come increasing salaries. If needing later to find a job, then one of the problems to face is prospective companies telling you that you are overqualified - basically because they want to pay a YOUNGER person a LOWER salary, and they will find such persons to hire.

    There is also another problem. As you just "Keep working", your kinds of experiences may grow very little or not at all, since you had lack of opportunity to learn newer or better or more things.
     
  18. Nov 24, 2017 #17
    Yes, but what if a person go to the university two or three years after the average people.
    Can be this a deficit?
     
  19. Nov 24, 2017 #18

    symbolipoint

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    Yes, but not always an impossible deficit. In this general case, having some experience can help. By the time you graduate and look for a job, other people have graduated and are at your age and already have their 2 or 3 years of experience (while you were finishing your last 2 or 3 years of school).
     
  20. Nov 24, 2017 #19
    I'm not talking about years of experience, but about the fact of going to the university after be 19 years old.
     
  21. Nov 24, 2017 #20

    symbolipoint

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    Not clear. Too wide open. Go to university at age 20 versus go to university at age 40 - very different. Which person more likely has at least 10 years of experience in their field? Which person more likely has very little experience? To be clearer and practical: Decide on the major field, pick and attend university, earn your degree, and then find a job. Stay in the job for a while (or quickly look for a new one if you lose your first job).
     
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