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How old is too old for equipment and other safety issues

  1. Feb 12, 2018 #1
    Disclaimer: I forget the names of tools often for some reason so I will often describe the tool rather than say it's name

    My shop teacher recently told me one of our machines is 45 years old. If I recall correctly it is the planar (device used to flatten the faces of wood). How long do you think one should use a device until it should be replaced? Although I am unsure of the ages of the other devices I doubt they are as young as 10 years old.

    Also what are some safety policies and such he should do?

    Lastly is it a bad idea to use regular glasses instead of safety glasses in the shop? He told one of my friends to do that
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Feb 13, 2018
  2. jcsd
  3. Feb 12, 2018 #2

    FactChecker

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    That depends on how much trouble it is giving you, whether the results are good enough, and on safety considerations. The trouble is easy to observe when it is used. If it doesn't work well, it may not make the wood flat enough. The safety considerations require you to know how dangerous the old equipment is and whether buying new equipment would give you additional safety devices that the old one does not have.
    In general, this is ABSOLUTELY BAD ADVICE! Especially if his regular glasses are glass. I have scars and once had to have broken glass removed from my eye. Even if his regular glasses are shatter-proof, they often do not cover the sides as well as safety glasses do. Also the frames of regular glasses can break and do a lot of damage. Use safety glasses or goggles.
     
    Last edited: Feb 12, 2018
  4. Feb 12, 2018 #3

    phinds

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    As FactChecker said, that depends on lots of things. It is not unusual for woodworking machines to be used for 100 years, but it is also possible for them to become unsafe quickly if they are flawed and have poor maintenance that allows the flaw to get worse.
     
  5. Feb 12, 2018 #4

    CWatters

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    Some old power tools don't have the safety features that modern ones do. For example many modern power tools are designed to stop rotating quickly when switched off. Older ones can take a long time to coast to a stop.
     
  6. Feb 12, 2018 #5

    FactChecker

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    This is the most important thing to say. And if you ever get your sleeve caught in the machine, you will quickly realize the importance of this.
     
  7. Feb 13, 2018 #6

    Averagesupernova

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    @Stephenk53
    You must have an idea in your mind of when something should be replaced because it is 'old'. What number would that be?
     
  8. Feb 13, 2018 #7
    Although i have minimal experience I would say it depends upon the device and setting it is used in. Since it is a school and many older devices don't have modern safety features I would say 10 - 20 years as a general rule. However considering they had been left to gather dust for at least 5 years (probably longer) and some of them have needed some repairs, I'd think they would need to be replaced sooner than 20. Plus I don't think they have been cleaned in a long time.

    What do you guys think about my estimate as far as tools in a school goes?
     
  9. Feb 13, 2018 #8
    By the way the planar is a bit damaged and often causes extrusions on the wood. He did say the blade is damaged from a previous student from last year.
     
  10. Feb 13, 2018 #9

    berkeman

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    Did the student survive being planed?
     
  11. Feb 13, 2018 #10
    Luckily the student wasn't planed and it was plywood that was. I don't know what exactly happened but there were no injuries.
     
  12. Feb 13, 2018 #11

    phinds

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    Planer blades are among the most difficult woodworking tools to keep in top shape and they really NEED to be in top shape to do their job properly.
     
  13. Feb 13, 2018 #12

    Averagesupernova

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    To get a truly furniture quality board, it needs to be run through a drum sander after planning. You can ALWAYS expect a planer to leave strips.
    -
    Truth is most planers nowadays are junk. To get one to plane anything more than 4 inches wide is asking a lot. They are just not built solid enough. This is one that I use. Not kidding.
    IMG_20180213_164154.jpg
     
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