How to find the specific volume?

In summary: If wouldn't be a double interpolation. It would only be a single interpolation: predicted specific volume versus observed specific volume. It is not possible with this information to get the exact right result.
  • #1
xCuzIcanx
8
0

Homework Statement



So a chart is given.
| | Water vapor at p (pressure)=0.006MPa | Water vapor at p (pressure)=0.035
| T(in degree C) | v(m^3/kg) | v(m^3/kg)
| 80 | 27.132 | 4.526
| 120 | 30.219 | 4.625

Find: Specific v (m3/kg) at T = 100 oC and p = 0.01 MPa Show work

I don't even know where to begin.
 
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  • #2
You can't even quote some relevant equations?
 
  • #3
haruspex said:
You can't even quote some relevant equations?

Well a new semester started and the teacher didn't give us anything except to do this problem.. I wish I knew what was going on but the teacher only taught us definitions and nothing else.
 
  • #4
What is the equation for the specific volume of a gas as a function of temperature, pressure, molecular weight, and gas constant predicted by the ideal gas law. If you apply this equation to water vapor at the three sets of conditions in this problem, what does the ideal gas law predict for the specific volume in each case?

Chet
 
  • #5
Chestermiller said:
What is the equation for the specific volume of a gas as a function of temperature, pressure, molecular weight, and gas constant predicted by the ideal gas law. If you apply this equation to water vapor at the three sets of conditions in this problem, what does the ideal gas law predict for the specific volume in each case?

Chet

I know that the ideal gas law equation is PV=nRT

and so then would the relevant equation be v=V/m? which is v=RT/P?
 
  • #6
xCuzIcanx said:
I know that the ideal gas law equation is PV=nRT

and so then would the relevant equation be v=V/m? which is v=RT/P?

No, but you are close. The correct result is:

[itex]v = \frac{V}{nm}[/itex] in volume per unit mass units,

where m is the molecular weight. Now substitute into the ideal gas law. Then calculate the specific volume of water in the three cases as if it were an ideal gas. Make a table with two columns: column 1 is the specific volume calculated from the ideal gas law; column 2 is the observed specific volume (there will be a blank in the table for the observed specific volume that you are solving for).
 
  • #7
Oh all right, but can you do this with double interpolation? if so what would be the process
 
  • #8
xCuzIcanx said:
Oh all right, but can you do this with double interpolation? if so what would be the process

If wouldn't be a double interpolation. It would only be a single interpolation: predicted specific volume versus observed specific volume. It is not possible with this information to get the exact right result. You are just using your fundamental knowledge base to make your best estimate. Even with this, it is going to have to be a linear interpolation. You might also try to do this problem using the compressibility factor z and the corresponding states plot (if you have learned about that yet).
 

Related to How to find the specific volume?

1. What is specific volume?

Specific volume is a measure of the volume occupied by a unit mass of a substance. It is denoted by the symbol "v" and is typically expressed in units of cubic meters per kilogram (m^3/kg).

2. How do you calculate specific volume?

Specific volume can be calculated by dividing the volume of a substance by its mass. In other words, specific volume = volume/mass. The resulting value will be in units of volume per unit mass.

3. Why is specific volume important in science?

Specific volume is an important parameter in thermodynamics and fluid mechanics. It helps to characterize the properties of a substance and is used in various equations and calculations related to these fields.

4. What is the relationship between density and specific volume?

Density and specific volume are inversely related. This means that as the specific volume of a substance increases, its density decreases. Similarly, as the specific volume decreases, the density increases.

5. How do you convert specific volume to other units?

To convert specific volume from one unit to another, you can use conversion factors or unit conversion equations. For example, to convert from cubic meters per kilogram to cubic centimeters per gram, you can use the conversion factor 1 m^3/kg = 1000 cm^3/g.

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