I don't understand Archimedes principle

In summary, Archimedes principle can be used to calculate the upward force on an object submerged in water.
  • #1
lionely
576
2

Homework Statement


The problem is I have about 13 questions to do, but I don't understand Archimedes principle when my teacher was supposed to teach it at school, all he did was send notes...
I do extra classes for Physics, the teacher there taught it, I understand a little better, but still not to the extent I want to, the teacher gave homework, the questions are quite difficult quoting him " These questions can kill a cow." So I was wondering if someone here could explain it at a Grade 11 level.
 
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  • #2


Archimedes principle! You could look it up!

A floating body displaces an amount of fluid equal to the weight of the body.
 
  • #3


If you have already learned how to calculate pressure under water, here is a simple demonstration of Archimedes principle.

Consider a cube of material that has side length L. If you were to push the object under water until the upper flat surface was just at the water's surface, what would the force be to hold it there?

Understanding that pressure acts perpendicular to the submerged surface, there is only one surface that provides an upward force. That is the bottom surface. The side faces only see a pressure force that tries to crush the cube so there is no vertical component. The pressure at depth L is

P = rho * L
where rho is the density of water in the units of weight per unit volume of fluid and L is the depth which is the length of the cube's edge.

The upward force is therefore

F = P * A = P * L * L

where A is the area of a cube face.

P = rho * L

so

F = rho * L * L * L

L^3 is the volume. So in this case the upward force is the density of the fluid (weight units) times the volume. Volume is the amount of fluid displaced by the submerged object.

For objects that have curved surfaces or if the cube were not oriented as here the problem becomes considerably more complicated and involves calculus to figure out. But Archimedes did the figuring for us. While what I have written does not prove anything, it nevertheless provides an easily understandable example providing you know that pressure is density(weight/unit volume) times depth.
 
  • #4


I thank you so much, I will try to apply this to my questions. Which seem very difficult =.=
 
  • #5


I understand the frustration of not fully grasping a concept even after attending classes and studying. Archimedes principle is a fundamental concept in physics that explains how objects float or sink in a fluid. It states that the upward buoyant force on an object immersed in a fluid is equal to the weight of the fluid that the object displaces. This means that if an object is less dense than the fluid it is in, it will float, and if it is more dense, it will sink.

To understand this principle better, it is important to understand the concept of density. Density is the amount of mass in a given volume of an object. For example, a block of wood is less dense than a block of iron because it has less mass in the same volume. When an object is placed in a fluid, it experiences two forces - its weight pulling it down and the buoyant force pushing it up. If the buoyant force is greater than the weight, the object will float.

To apply this principle to your homework questions, you will need to use the formula for density (density = mass/volume) and the formula for buoyant force (buoyant force = density of fluid x volume of displaced fluid x gravitational acceleration). Remember that the volume of the displaced fluid is equal to the volume of the submerged part of the object.

I hope this explanation helps you understand Archimedes principle better. If you have any further questions, do not hesitate to ask your teacher or seek help from a tutor. With practice and understanding, you will be able to tackle those "cow-killing" questions with ease.
 

1. What is Archimedes' principle?

Archimedes' principle states that an object partially or fully submerged in a fluid experiences an upward force known as buoyancy that is equal to the weight of the displaced fluid.

2. Why is it important to understand Archimedes' principle?

Understanding Archimedes' principle is important in various fields such as engineering, physics, and chemistry. It helps us understand the behavior of objects in fluids and enables us to design and build structures that can float or submerge in different fluids.

3. How does Archimedes' principle work?

Archimedes' principle is based on the concept that the pressure exerted by a fluid on an object is greater at the bottom than at the top. This results in a net upward force on the object, pushing it upwards and causing it to float or rise in the fluid.

4. What are some real-life examples of Archimedes' principle?

Some examples of Archimedes' principle in everyday life include a ship floating on water, a hot air balloon rising in the air, and a submarine changing its depth in the ocean. It also explains why objects feel lighter when submerged in water, as the buoyant force counteracts some of their weight.

5. How is Archimedes' principle related to density?

Archimedes' principle is directly related to density, as the buoyant force is dependent on the density of the fluid and the volume of the submerged object. An object with a higher density than the fluid will sink, while an object with a lower density will float. This is why objects made of different materials can have different behaviors in the same fluid.

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