I have a question about Beta Decay

  • Thread starter Ryan Lucas
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In Beta radioactive decay, how do quarks rearrange themselves in these situations? Do they do this?

ß+ : 1p (2u, 1d) + energy ==> 1n (2d, 1u) + 1e-

ß- : 1n (2d, 1u) ==> 1p (2u, 1d) + 1e- + energy

I believe I have these right. Positive Beta decay is "endothermic" while negative Beta decay is "exothermic", because a neutron is bigger than a proton plus and electron, and so due to the conservation of matter, and E=mc^2, energy must make up the loss in mass. Please correct me if I'm wrong!
 

Answers and Replies

  • #3
Rade
Ryan Lucas said:
In Beta radioactive decay, how do quarks rearrange themselves in these situations? Do they do this?
ß+ : 1p (2u, 1d) + energy ==> 1n (2d, 1u) + 1e-
ß- : 1n (2d, 1u) ==> 1p (2u, 1d) + 1e- + energy
I believe I have these right. Positive Beta decay is "endothermic" while negative Beta decay is "exothermic", because a neutron is bigger than a proton plus and electron, and so due to the conservation of matter, and E=mc^2, energy must make up the loss in mass. Please correct me if I'm wrong!
Your equations at the macroscopic level are incomplete...you are missing the neutrino and its antimatter mirror, but the quark structure for P and N is OK:
For negatron B(-) decay:
N ==> P + B(-) + antineutrino + Q decay energy released.​
For positron B(+) decay:
P ==> N + B(+) + neutrino​
Positron decay is possible only when the mass of the parent is greater than daughter by 2 electron masses.
 

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