I want to learn about Quantum Computing

In summary, there are several recommended sources for learning about Quantum Computing, including "Quantum Computing for Computer Scientists," "Quantum Approach to Informatics," and "Programming Quantum Computers." These sources cater to different levels of knowledge and provide a variety of perspectives on the subject. While there may be some overlap with concepts introduced by Feynman, the field of Quantum Computing has evolved and focuses on solving problems unrelated to quantum systems. It is recommended to keep up with the rapidly evolving field and to not be deterred by texts that also cover Quantum Mechanics.
  • #1
Thomas Rigby
22
3
I want to learn about Quantum Computing (QC). I am familiar with Quantum Mechanics. So far I have found two types of literature: (1.) Introductions to QC for the layman, and (2) Literature for people who are already knowledgeable about the field. Can someone recommend a mid-level source along the lines of "Quantum Computing for People that know Quantum Mechanics"?

Secondary question - I have read this old Feynman lecture where he introduces the idea of a Quantum Computer. Is there a relationship between those ideas and what is nowadays referred to as Quantum Computing? Or have the ideas somehow diverged?
 
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  • #2
Thomas Rigby said:
I want to learn about Quantum Computing (QC). I am familiar with Quantum Mechanics. So far I have found two types of literature: (1.) Introductions to QC for the layman, and (2) Literature for people who are already knowledgeable about the field. Can someone recommend a mid-level source along the lines of "Quantum Computing for People that know Quantum Mechanics"?
I have never seen such a thing, in the same way as I have never seen a book on "Digital computing for people that know electronics". Understanding how a QC device works is very little help in understanding how to use it.

Thomas Rigby said:
Secondary question - I have read this old Feynman lecture where he introduces the idea of a Quantum Computer. Is there a relationship between those ideas and what is nowadays referred to as Quantum Computing?
Not really. Feynman posited that in order to simulate a quantum system you needed to use a quantum computer. In QC we mainly try to solve problems that have nothing to do with quantum systems, such as problems in number theory and combinatorics. Also we have learned that it is possible to simulate a QC device in software running on a classical computer, contrary to Feynman's supposition.

These Cambridge University course notes are a useful overview; if you want you can skim over Lectures 3 and 4 as fast as you are able to.
 
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  • #3
https://www.amazon.com/Programming-Quantum-Computers-Essential-Algorithms

That is an O'Reilly Book, which is usually the middle ground you seek. But the book is about using quantum computers, not how quantum computers work.
 
  • #4
I wouldn't reject a book just because it addresses the QM subjects. If you really know that part, you can quickly skim through it and you should be well prepared for the other parts of the book.
You should be aware that the field is rapidly evolving and there are a variety of approaches to the large number of challenges remaining.
 

Related to I want to learn about Quantum Computing

What is quantum computing?

Quantum computing is a form of computing that utilizes the principles of quantum mechanics to perform operations and calculations. It differs from classical computing in that it uses quantum bits (qubits) instead of classical bits, allowing for more complex and efficient calculations.

What are the potential applications of quantum computing?

Quantum computing has the potential to revolutionize various industries such as finance, healthcare, transportation, and more. It can be used to optimize complex systems, develop new materials, improve encryption methods, and simulate quantum systems.

How does quantum computing work?

Quantum computing uses the principles of superposition and entanglement to perform calculations. Superposition allows a qubit to exist in multiple states simultaneously, while entanglement allows qubits to be correlated with each other. This allows for parallel processing and more efficient computation.

What are the challenges in developing quantum computers?

One of the main challenges in developing quantum computers is maintaining the delicate state of qubits and reducing errors caused by external factors such as noise and vibration. Another challenge is scaling quantum computers to a larger number of qubits, as the complexity and difficulty of controlling them increases exponentially.

How can I learn about quantum computing?

There are various resources available for learning about quantum computing, including online courses, textbooks, and research papers. It is recommended to have a strong background in mathematics and computer science before delving into quantum computing. Additionally, attending workshops and conferences can provide valuable insights and networking opportunities with experts in the field.

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