If I connect two 4700 uf capacitors in parallel with my 8.3A battery

In summary: See the beam power this light is with 8.3A 12 battery but as beam needs 100W for low and 130 watt for high point I want its maximum output because bike also has tail light which has two bulbs they also draw some power and horn and speedo...In summary, a second battery will give you more power at the high point of the beam, but will not increase the power at the low point.
  • #1
core1985
34
2
Dear Friends

Read my post carefully. I have a motor bike having 8.3A battery bike had 35Watt headlight which was pretty bad. I decided to connect car beam 100w/130w as my battery total power is 12 x 8.3 = 99.6 Watt so you know it can only provide 90% power to 100w point only. Now tell me should I connect another battery of same company in parallel for maximum brilliance of my head light or someone told me about connecting capacitor in parallel with my battery if capacitor is the answer then which capacitor will suits best or if battery is the answer?? you people know what I meant tell me now help needed.
 
Engineering news on Phys.org
  • #2
core1985 said:
Dear Friends

Read my post carefully. I have a motor bike having 8.3A battery bike had 35Watt headlight which was pretty bad. I decided to connect car beam 100w/130w as my battery total power is 12 x 8.3 = 99.6 Watt so you know it can only provide 90% power to 100w point only. Now tell me should I connect another battery of same company in parallel for maximum brilliance of my head light or someone told me about connecting capacitor in parallel with my battery if capacitor is the answer then which capacitor will suits best or if battery is the answer?? you people know what I meant tell me now help needed.

Unfortunately the thing that will limit you is not the battery or a capacitor but the generating capacity of the motor bike, this is where ultimately all the electrical energy comes from to charge the battery (or capacitor), or run the lights etc.

Then a 12V battery with 8.3A, I am assuming here this is 8.3Ahr, ie energy storage capacity of the battery. If it is 8.3Ahr, then a fully charged battery will deliver 8.3A (or ~100W) for one hour, or 83A for 6 minutes etc (10x current => 1/10th time). So you can see adding another 8.3Ahr battery simply doubles the time to discharge at a given load.

So unless you have a strange driving cycle where you drive longer periods with no light to charge your battery(s), and only run the light for short periods, what you need is a generator that can deliver the extra power of the larger lights, not batteries or capacitors.

The easiest way you can tell if the generator capacity is enough is:
Connect a multimeter to the battery, showing voltage, with engine off it should be around 12-12.5V if the battery is good and charged.

Start engine. Battery voltage should increase to 13-13.8V indicating that the generator is now charging the battery (13.8V is float charge, 14.4 is fast charge).

Now switch on the lights, note the voltage at idle, and maybe rev engine to a few thousand rpm or where ever you cruise.

If the voltage in theses cases does not remain at 13.7V then this is a clear indication that the generator cannot support the load. If you see something like 11-12.5V, that means the battery is continuously being drained even while the engine is running.

If the voltage does not remain at the charging voltage you can only use the lights sparingly or you risk draining the battery even while the bike is being ridden. An extra battery in this case will only delay the inevitable.
 
  • Like
Likes jrmichler, davenn and berkeman
  • #3
Okay thanks I shall first check but it generator can support the load then can I use capacitors or second battery?
 
  • #4
core1985 said:
Okay thanks I shall first check but it generator can support the load then can I use capacitors or second battery?
Since you only use the headlight while the engine is running, the battery generally does not power the lights. The alternator does all of that work.
 
  • #5
core1985 said:
Okay thanks I shall first check but it generator can support the load then can I use capacitors or second battery?

If the generator can support the load then I don't see why you'd want to add either.

But if you did, the extra battery would make more sense, this gives you more run time on your lights with the engine off. But if you only use the lights while riding, I wouldn't do anything.
 
  • Like
Likes berkeman
  • #6
Can't you switch to LED lights which use far less power?
 
  • Like
Likes Windadct and hutchphd
  • #7
No LED is bad it only illuminates 3-4 feet then road cannot be seen I only have 40Watt less power issue If I install a second battery only 4AH 12v that is 48Watt then my generator can easily charge it also because when I give throttle even a little my beam become bright let me post pics so that you can understand
 
  • #8
See the beam power this light is with 8.3A 12 battery but as beam needs 100W for low and 130 watt for high point I want its maximum output because bike also has tail light which has two bulbs they also draw some power and horn and speedo meter bulbs but for speedo meter I have replaced them with LEDS
 

Attachments

  • Bike.jpg
    Bike.jpg
    43.5 KB · Views: 173
  • #9
core1985 said:
Okay thanks I shall first check but it generator can support the load then can I use capacitors or second battery?
capacitors won't do anything
They are used in cars with high power stereo systems to hold up the voltage during brief peaks in high power usage … not for a continuous load
 
  • #10
core1985 said:
No LED is bad it only illuminates 3-4 feet then road cannot be seen

Then you are not using the correct LED's
LED lighting on vehicles is becoming much more common
 
  • #11
A LED light uses fewer watts per lumen. Watts are a unit of power, and lumens are a unit of light. So you can buy a LED light just as bright as you need, and it will use less power than an incandescent light with the same light output. As @davenn said, you are looking at the wrong LED.
 
  • Like
Likes davenn
  • #12
core1985 said:
Dear Friends

Read my post carefully. I have a motor bike having 8.3A battery bike had 35Watt headlight which was pretty bad. I decided to connect car beam 100w/130w as my battery total power is 12 x 8.3 = 99.6 Watt so you know it can only provide 90% power to 100w point only. Now tell me should I connect another battery of same company in parallel for maximum brilliance of my head light or someone told me about connecting capacitor in parallel with my battery if capacitor is the answer then which capacitor will suits best or if battery is the answer?? you people know what I meant tell me now help needed.
You could use led headlights to save in energy consumption. Yes, you can use an extra-battery of the same type in parallel. Although when the motor is on, the alternator is charging the battery, that battery is still connected and will furnish current if need be. Your alternator will take more time to fully charge both batteries instead of just one but otherwise the alternator will not suffer because of the presence of 2 batteries instead of one. The capacitors won't help.
 
  • #13
Bundle of thanks so I am planning to install another battery of same type 8.3A
 
  • #14
Yes I have removed capacitors :)
 
  • #15
Yes this is the answer now for my questions now tell me second battery should be of same type or it can be of different amperes? I mean to say 4Ah battery is little cheaper :P
 
  • #16
Yes my alternator will take some more time but it will have a lot of time to rest after charging because two batteries will not drain fast they will take longer time and also motor bike light will be super bright as I want
 
  • #17
I shall check my connecting my car battery on switch off engine and disconnecting this battery to see the full brightness of light
 

Related to If I connect two 4700 uf capacitors in parallel with my 8.3A battery

1. What is the purpose of connecting two 4700 uf capacitors in parallel with an 8.3A battery?

The purpose of connecting capacitors in parallel with a battery is to increase the total capacitance and therefore increase the amount of charge that can be stored. This can be useful for applications that require a large amount of energy in a short period of time, such as starting a motor or powering a high-powered device.

2. How does connecting capacitors in parallel affect the overall voltage of the circuit?

Connecting capacitors in parallel does not affect the overall voltage of the circuit. The voltage across each capacitor will remain the same as the voltage of the battery.

3. Is there a limit to the number of capacitors that can be connected in parallel with a battery?

There is no specific limit to the number of capacitors that can be connected in parallel with a battery. However, it is important to consider the total capacitance and make sure it does not exceed the maximum capacitance rating of the battery.

4. What happens if the capacitors have different capacitance values?

If the capacitors have different capacitance values, the total capacitance of the circuit will be equal to the sum of the individual capacitances. This means that the capacitors will not share the charge equally and the voltage across each capacitor may be different.

5. Are there any safety concerns when connecting capacitors in parallel with a battery?

Yes, there are some safety concerns when connecting capacitors in parallel with a battery. If the capacitors are not rated for the same voltage as the battery, they may become damaged or fail. It is important to use capacitors with the correct voltage rating and to handle them carefully to avoid electrical shocks.

Similar threads

  • Electrical Engineering
Replies
17
Views
1K
  • Electrical Engineering
Replies
15
Views
3K
  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
20
Views
609
Replies
31
Views
2K
Replies
13
Views
3K
  • Electrical Engineering
Replies
15
Views
2K
  • Electrical Engineering
Replies
1
Views
2K
  • Electrical Engineering
Replies
7
Views
3K
Replies
4
Views
519
Replies
10
Views
2K
Back
Top