I If I had a cubic metre of solid osmium, a perfect cube...

If i shon a red laser across the surface of the osmium cube 5mm above the solid perfect 1000mm cube, by how many degrees would it be deflected?
 
This is not a reply it is another question what density and quantity of matter would I require to bend a red laser beam by15 degrees? What I am really asking is how hard is it to bend space time. I am going to suggest that it is too hard to produce the force we mistakenly call gravity.
I suggest what we experience as gravity is not a force in its own right it is an artifact of the strong force leaking out from the nucleii of atoms. Because space time is scale invarient it would be nearly but not quite pinched off around a nucleus. A tiny portal is left to allow a tiny fraction of the strong force to leak out.
 
Last edited:

Drakkith

Staff Emeritus
Science Advisor
2018 Award
20,440
4,135
First, note that personal theories are not allowed here at PF. So don't expect your post to stay unlocked for very long.

Second, keep in mind that thousands of scientists do work involving either the strong nuclear force or general relativity, and none of their experiments or observations show any unambiguous results that disagree with either theory. In addition, the strong nuclear force literally cannot do what you are claiming it can do. If it can, then its not the strong nuclear force as has been observed in nature, but another force that has so far eluded every scientist in the world and every experiment in their arsenal to date.

We know this because we can make accurate predictions about what should happen involving the strong force and if it were possible that the strong force was responsible for gravity then these predictions would not be correct.

If you're going to disagree with a fundamental part of modern physics, then you're going to need a substantial amount of both evidence and the theory underlying your evidence. And I suspect that you have none of either.

I am going to suggest that it is too hard to produce the force we mistakenly call gravity.
It's not hard. You can do experiments in your basement.

See this video and the others like it:
 

davenn

Science Advisor
Gold Member
8,565
5,264
First, note that personal theories are not allowed here at PF. So don't expect your post to stay unlocked for very long.
Ohhh dear, indeed !


This is not a reply it is another question what density and quantity of matter would I require to bend a red laser beam by15 degrees?
Something around the mass of the sun or bigger


I am going to suggest that it is too hard to produce the force we mistakenly call gravity.
You really should learn some real physics
 

Nugatory

Mentor
11,966
4,472
I am going to suggest that it is too hard to produce the force we mistakenly call gravity.
Yes, it's hard to "produce" gravity in the sense that it's a relatively weak force so it takes a lot of mass to produce even a small gravitational force - we have the entire mass of the earth producing a gravitational field, and a tiny little refrigerator magnet can outpull that field. Nonetheless.....
  • There is a lot of mass in the universe. If your cube of osmium or the entire mass of the earth isn't enough to produce an interesting deflection of a light beam, we can always try a suitable galaxy instead.
  • Gravity is always attractive so it's always adding up (compare with electromagnetism - very strong, but because of the opposite charges an atom exerts no net electromagnetic force on things near it).
  • Gravitational forces get weaker with distance but never die out.
Putting this all together and actually doing the math, we can show that there is a force that is proportional to mass, and that our current best theories of gravity explain it really well.

Physics Forums is here to explain what modern physics does say, not to entertain new theories based on misunderstandings, so this thread is closed.
 

Physics Forums Values

We Value Quality
• Topics based on mainstream science
• Proper English grammar and spelling
We Value Civility
• Positive and compassionate attitudes
• Patience while debating
We Value Productivity
• Disciplined to remain on-topic
• Recognition of own weaknesses
• Solo and co-op problem solving

Hot Threads

Top