If this hand water pump was instead at the bottom of a well....

In summary: So it seems like the lever would be more effective if it could pump more per stroke then? Thank you very much phinds! So it seems like the lever would be more effective if it could pump more per stroke then?
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RipleyGallegos
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Seems to me what matters is the force required to get the water up and I don't see why that would be any different whether you were pulling it up or pushing it up. The height of the water column is the same either way.
 
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  • #3
phinds said:
Seems to me what matters is the force required to get the water up and I don't see why that would be any different whether you were pulling it up or pushing it up. The height of the water column is the same either way.

Okay Thank you! What if the little lever only pumped 1 gallon per stroke at like only 10lbs of pressure. & say his was a well with 500 gallons in it. From the top it seems there isn't much of any water weighing down on the piston so that the lever is very easy to push n pull.
If the piston is on the bottom doesn't it seem like we than would have 500 gallons weighing down on it? It seems to me that it would take much more force to pump that 1 gallon from the bottom. Hmm
 
  • #4
Suppose you have a straw two feet long and you stick it 1.5' into a very tall glass and suck up the liquid in the glass. That takes a certain amount of force. Now stick the same straw 1.5' into a lake and suck up the lake water. I think you logic would say that the latter requires more effort but of course it doesn't. What matters is the column of water being moved.
 
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  • #5
phinds said:
Suppose you have a straw two feet long and you stick it 1.5' into a very tall glass and suck up the liquid in the glass. That takes a certain amount of force. Now stick the same straw 1.5' into a lake and suck up the lake water. I think you logic would say that the latter requires more effort but of course it doesn't. What matters is the column of water being moved.

Wow that's a really great way of putting it! But do you think sucking or pumping up is equivalent to pushing or lifting up?
 
  • #6
RipleyGallegos said:
Wow that's a really great way of putting it! But do you think sucking or pumping up is equivalent to pushing or lifting up?
Yes, if you are talking about exerting a force on a specific column of liquid. Again, all that matters is the amount of liquid being moved. If you are pushing up a 1cm diameter column of water it makes no difference whether that column is surrounded by a glass full of water or an ocean full of water.
 
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  • #7
phinds said:
Yes, if you are talking about exerting a force on a specific column of liquid. Again, all that matters is the amount of liquid being moved. If you are pushing up a 1cm diameter column of water it makes no difference whether that column is surrounded by a glass full of water or an ocean full of water.

Thank you very much phinds!
 

Related to If this hand water pump was instead at the bottom of a well....

1. How does the hand water pump work at the bottom of a well?

The hand water pump at the bottom of a well works by using a lever and piston mechanism to draw water up from the well. When the handle is moved up and down, it causes the piston to move, creating suction that pulls water up from the well and into the pump.

2. What is the advantage of having a hand water pump at the bottom of a well?

The main advantage of having a hand water pump at the bottom of a well is that it can access deeper water sources than surface pumps. This is especially useful in areas where water tables are low or during droughts when surface water sources may dry up.

3. How deep does the well need to be for a hand water pump to work?

The depth of the well needed for a hand water pump to work depends on the type of pump and the water table in the area. However, most hand water pumps can work in wells up to 100 feet deep.

4. Can a hand water pump at the bottom of a well be used for drinking water?

Yes, a hand water pump at the bottom of a well can be used for drinking water. However, it is important to regularly test the water for any contaminants and to properly maintain the pump to ensure the water remains safe to drink.

5. How do you maintain a hand water pump at the bottom of a well?

Maintenance for a hand water pump at the bottom of a well includes regularly cleaning and lubricating the pump, checking for any damage or wear, and replacing any worn parts. It is also important to regularly test the water quality and to properly seal the well to prevent contamination.

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