Improving Airflow in a 2.5 Triumph Spitfire

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In summary, the Triumph Spitfire has a low pressure area at the rear which can pass exhaust gases back into the car. The car has been heavily modified with a new roof and three vents which will guide air to a rear mounted radiator. Fred Garvin suggests using a panel to draw air from beneath the car and direct it at the radiator.
  • #1
ukcjm
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Hi.
I am hoping for some advice on airflow...in particular, guaranteeing airflow to a rear mounted radiator, in my 2.5 Triumph Spitfire.
I have read, about low pressure, and high pressure areas, although I am a little confused as to the area underneath the car.
I understand that the lower a car is to the ground, the more the car "sucks" itself down...Bernoulli affect?
The Triumph Spitfire has a low pressure area at rear, which , can pass exhaust gases,back into the car.
I have heavily modified my car bodywork, in as much as i have nearly fabricated a new roof,(Am currently at "plug" stage). This roof has three vents, which will guide air to a rear mounted radiator.In addition, i flowed the roof back, similar to fastback design, which in that case allowed the car to gain 7mph top end speed.
Now I am looking to enhance the overall flow, to rear radiator, by using the under car air.
The rear radiator will be mounted in the boot area, and angled, with two cooling fans.
I was thinking, that i could use a panel, gathering air from beneath the car, and directing it at radiator.
I have some photos on my blog, if these will help,
http://ukcjmspitfire.blogspot.com/
Any advice, comments, or observations greatly appreciated.
 
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  • #2
It is tough to generalize that just because a car is closer to the ground the pressure will be lower. Perhaps it is. I would think its a function of body style and geometry, not location. Anyways, let's say it is. What about using some kind of scoop system much like engines use? Of course you would have to make sure that your radiator could handle the engine heat load at a standstill all by itself.
 
  • #3
Hi FredGarvin, thank you for your reply.
The three vents i have already, directing air to rear rad', could be classed as scoops, i think, (?), but i still feel i have to at least double the guaranteed air to rear radiator.
Do you mean scoops below boot area drawing air passing underneath car?
I have to be careful, in that aesthetically i don't want the car to look like it came from the "Mad Max" design school. So adding more scoops above, or on outer bodywork is a no no.Hence idea of drawing air from below car.
The rear boot section will be completely open, IE, no boot lid. And will have twin cooling fans. In my previous experience of using this car, (Although now with more HP), i feel this will be enough for standstill.

Incidentally, how can i calculate downforce pressure, for a given area, and angled wing please?
 

Related to Improving Airflow in a 2.5 Triumph Spitfire

1. How can I improve the airflow in my 2.5 Triumph Spitfire?

There are a few ways to improve the airflow in your 2.5 Triumph Spitfire. One option is to install a performance air filter, which allows for better air flow and can increase horsepower. Another option is to upgrade the exhaust system, which can improve overall engine performance and air flow. Additionally, making sure the air intake and ventilation systems are clean and free of any debris can also improve airflow.

2. Will improving the airflow affect the fuel efficiency of my 2.5 Triumph Spitfire?

Yes, improving the airflow in your 2.5 Triumph Spitfire can potentially increase fuel efficiency. When the engine is able to breathe more easily, it can burn fuel more efficiently, resulting in better gas mileage. However, this also depends on other factors such as driving habits and the condition of the car.

3. Are there any other benefits to improving airflow in my 2.5 Triumph Spitfire?

Yes, besides potential increases in horsepower and fuel efficiency, improving airflow can also lead to a smoother and more responsive engine performance. It can also help prevent overheating and extend the lifespan of the engine.

4. Can I improve the airflow without making any modifications to my 2.5 Triumph Spitfire?

Yes, there are some simple steps you can take to improve airflow without making any modifications. These include regularly changing the air filter, cleaning the air intake and ventilation systems, and ensuring proper tire inflation to reduce drag on the car.

5. Is there a specific air filter or exhaust system that is recommended for improving airflow in a 2.5 Triumph Spitfire?

There are various options for air filters and exhaust systems that can improve airflow in a 2.5 Triumph Spitfire. It is recommended to do research and consult with a mechanic or fellow Spitfire owners to determine the best options for your specific car and desired results.

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