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Industrial electronics: Unclear symbols

  1. Sep 12, 2011 #1

    Femme_physics

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    1. The problem statement, all variables and given/known data

    So in this circuit
    http://img850.imageshack.us/img850/5061/circuittoregulate.jpg [Broken]


    Given that alpha = 60 degrees

    I'm asked to draw qualitatively Vin, URL, UAK, and IAK.

    Now Vin and URL are simple, but what ARE UAK and IAK? What are they? I don't see an "A" point on a circuit nor a "K" point
     
    Last edited by a moderator: May 5, 2017
  2. jcsd
  3. Sep 12, 2011 #2

    Femme_physics

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    Last edited by a moderator: May 5, 2017
  4. Sep 12, 2011 #3

    I like Serena

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    Hi Fp! :smile:

    Don't you have a list of abbreviations in your course material?

    Anyway, I've just looked it up.
    See http://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thyristor
    It has a pic showing the Anode and Cathode (aka Kathode).
    That's your A and K of your Silicon Controlled Rectifier (SCR).
     
    Last edited: Sep 12, 2011
  5. Sep 12, 2011 #4

    I like Serena

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    This is going to be soooooo messy with 3 problems in 1 thread.
    I'm sure we will all be very confused very soon which problem/picture belongs to which post.
    Can I suggest you make separate threads for them? :wink:


    Hmm, you removed the diodes. I guess that's ok as long as you keep careful track of the direction of the currents. As it is, I'm afraid you didn't. I3 can't flow the way you drew it.

    Furthermore, you have drawn the 2 batteries in opposite directions, but that is never so.
    You have 2 cases, but in each case the batteries must be in the same direction.

    Finally, your 3rd equation is redundant. It is effectively contained in the first 2 equations.
    That's the reason your calculator does not accept it.
    You should add a KCL equation though...
     
    Last edited by a moderator: May 5, 2017
  6. Sep 12, 2011 #5

    I like Serena

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    Oh, the 3rd problem is a double-post....
     
  7. Sep 12, 2011 #6

    I like Serena

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    As for the SCR problem, the element doesn't quite work like a regular diode.

    Under normal circumstance it blocks in *both* directions.
    It's only when a pulse is given on the "Gate" that current can flow through, in the regular direction of the diode, and then only as long as the voltage is up to keep it flowing.

    When the voltage gets negative it blocks again in both directions.
     
  8. Sep 12, 2011 #7

    Femme_physics

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    hehe....hey ILS! :wink:

    Responding from your new offices at the dead sea? :D


    Ah, you're right, I suppose this is exactly why they gave us alpha - the angle of ignition :smile:

    What do you mean by "pulse"?

    And where is the gate? Is it the long horizontal line at the end of the triangle's tip?

    Be back in 4-5 hrs
     
  9. Sep 12, 2011 #8

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    Yep! :smile:
    I've been swimming ON the water. It's never been so easy to do a crawl (as long as you keep you face well above the water - you really don't want water in your eyes!) :approve:

    And what's really weird, is that there are lots of Dutch people here! :surprised:!!)


    And I've found a computer terminal at the reception, that makes this *a lot* easier.




    Huh? :confused:
    As yet this has nothing to do with alpha.



    In this picture you can see how it behaves.
    The bottom graph shows what a "pulse" looks like.

    [URL]http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/0/07/Regulated_rectifier.gif[/URL]



    Yep, as you can see in this picture:
    [URL]http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/9/93/Thyristor_circuit_symbol.svg/200px-Thyristor_circuit_symbol.svg.png[/URL]


    Good that you mention that! :approve:

    But... does that mean you want to do more work late in the evening? :confused:
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Apr 26, 2017
  10. Sep 13, 2011 #9

    Femme_physics

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    Got it :) ]

    Ended up falling asleep ^^

    Oh right, where alpha is the ignition angle.

    hehe gOod to know :smile:


    Good! and thanks.

    About to leave for the test soon. thanks for everything!
     
  11. Sep 13, 2011 #10

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    Good luck!
     
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