Inelastic Collision Derivation Help

In summary, the conversation discusses the derivation of an equation and the need to consider assumptions when discussing physical problems. The link provided offers further information on the topic, and the requester is reminded to post their questions in the appropriate forum.
  • #1
GreenSabbath
17
0
http://upload.wikimedia.org/math/a/8/a/a8a9e87d40533ad47fadb40725a4a3e5.png"

How wxactly has this equation be derived?

http://upload.wikimedia.org/math/3/c/5/3c53f3d1c66725053decc7e3e546c32d.png"

Can someone help me with the derivation. I can't trace the orgin of the second part od the systems of equation.

Help needed urgently Thanks
 
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  • #2
When talking about certain physical problems, you should consider the assumptions under which some equations related to these problems are derived. For example, what is conserved in every collision?

Further on, this link should help: http://hyperphysics.phy-astr.gsu.edu/hbase/inecol.html" .
 
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Related to Inelastic Collision Derivation Help

1. How do you derive the equation for inelastic collisions?

The equation for inelastic collisions can be derived using the conservation of momentum and conservation of kinetic energy principles. First, we equate the total momentum before and after the collision, then we equate the total kinetic energy before and after the collision. Solving these two equations simultaneously will give us the final equation for inelastic collisions.

2. What is the difference between an inelastic and elastic collision?

In an elastic collision, both momentum and kinetic energy are conserved, meaning there is no loss of energy during the collision. In an inelastic collision, only momentum is conserved, and there is a loss of kinetic energy due to the conversion of some of it into other forms of energy, such as heat or sound.

3. Why is the coefficient of restitution used in inelastic collisions?

The coefficient of restitution is used in inelastic collisions to quantify the amount of kinetic energy lost during the collision. It is defined as the ratio of the relative velocity of separation to the relative velocity of approach between two objects after colliding. A perfectly inelastic collision would have a coefficient of restitution of 0, while a perfectly elastic collision would have a coefficient of restitution of 1.

4. Can the equation for inelastic collisions be applied to all types of collisions?

No, the equation for inelastic collisions can only be applied to collisions where there is no external force acting on the system. This means that the objects must collide and interact with each other without any outside interference or forces.

5. How is the equation for inelastic collisions used in real-life applications?

The equation for inelastic collisions is used in various fields, such as physics, engineering, and sports. It helps in understanding the behavior of objects during collisions and can be used to design safety measures for cars, analyze the impact of sports equipment, and study the dynamics of particles in particle accelerators.

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