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Atomic Introductory (yet rigorous) Organic/Inorganic Chemistry book

  1. Aug 22, 2017 #1
    I'm a student in Pre-med looking to begin self-studying chemistry at a meticulous level. Since I've only recently graduated I haven't been too full on my course load, and I'm ready to change that immediately. However, as a student, I have no clue how I might choose great authors who give a comprehensive analysis of the subject, with poor ones who simply get you through exams.

    Up until now, I've been using the following books to assist me with my studies:

    Campbell's Biology: A foundation approach to the wonderful field. It's far from anything meticulous, but again it's supposed to give a general understanding of the subject. For a high-school textbook, it's served it's purpose beautifully.

    Zhumdal Chemistry: Again, it's only a high-school book, so It doesn't intend to serve as the forerunner of the subject. This is one of the authors I'm unsure about: It's explanations for electro-chemistry and Kinematics in general just felt too simplistic: Like It was neglecting something.

    So now that I'm ready to begin, I'm wondering: What books do you recommend for biochemistry and both organic/inorganic chemistry? I'm looking for calculus based books which provide a rich understanding of the subjects. My goal isn't to just pass exams, but to nurture a firm understanding of the subjects at a physical level. As for which books I'm looking at, I've had the following in mind:

    For Biochemistry I've been using: Lehninger- However I'm using the fifth edition that was a free-PDF, and it's age seems to show in a few places. So far i'm not sure whether or not I can say it's a good book, as I've only begun simple reviews, and integration of concepts I'm already familiar with.

    I've heard that for Organic/Inorganic chemistry, you would use Linus Pauling, but from what I've heard, the books on my level are more supplemental than comprehensive. Oxtoby or Atkins have been recommended to me, and I know that they're calculus based, so I'm leaning more towards them.

    Any help and recommendations would be greatly appreciated!
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Aug 22, 2017 #2

    Charles Link

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  4. Aug 22, 2017 #3

    Dr Transport

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    I liked McMurray and Fay for general chem and didn't mind McMurray's organic text inaddition to the text required for organic.
     
  5. Aug 23, 2017 #4


    I appreciate your suggestions, but I'd like some insight regarding these authors: I want to purchase a hardcover, and would like to ensure that i purchase is of the highest quality.

    Could you,, for istance, provide comparisons between the authors: what do their books integrate, and how do they convey their ideas: will they provide a comprehensive undertaking of the subject, or do they only show limitrd examples for the sake of tests? Ive heard thst otoxby us in the realm of chemistry books, so as of this moment, I'm leaning towards him.

    From what ive heard, his books include the following:
    -integration of physics, including quantum mechanical aspects of chemostry
    -Use of calculus both in chemistry and physics
    Advanced explanations of a multitude of fields, including electrochemistry, chemical kinetics, etc.

    As of now, I'm almost certsin im going to choose oxtoby, i just wanted feedback.
     
  6. Aug 23, 2017 #5

    Charles Link

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    Additional comment: Even though I'm a physicist, around 1990 I purchased Campbell's biology book and began reading it. It is extremely well written and a very good choice. :) ## \\ ## Editing: I need to make a correction to the above: The biology book that I purchased and read is by Arms and Camp=(close to Campbell, but not Campbell). Anyway, the Arms and Camp biology book is one that I would highly recommend.
     
    Last edited: Aug 23, 2017
  7. Aug 23, 2017 #6

    Dr Transport

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    That is for you to decide, look at the TOC and Index.
     
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