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Is a hollowed out fuselage ideal?

  1. Mar 7, 2015 #1
    The air passes through the fuselage. Will it have bad effects on the aerocraft? illustration.png
    Yes, I have horrible drawing skills.
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Mar 7, 2015 #2

    DaveC426913

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    Why is this a good thing in your opinion?

    I mean, lots of craft are essentially hollow tubes, but I suspect you weren't thinking in terms of a propulsion cavity.

    North_American_F86-01.JPG
     
  4. Mar 7, 2015 #3
    It becomes a pain to integrate avionics, fuel, and other essentials into the aircraft when a good portion of that internal volume exists so that air can flow through it. Not only that but skin friction drag would increase because there's more wetted area for boundary layers to form on.
     
  5. Mar 8, 2015 #4
    What if it's a plain 'ol tube? Without engines and that?
     
  6. Mar 8, 2015 #5

    DaveC426913

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    What is your rationale? What problem are you hoping it solves?

    I'm not suggesting there is anything wrong with the idea, but if I posed a question such as 'what if I made a television shaped like a donut?', wouldn't you need to ask about my logic before answering?
     
  7. Mar 8, 2015 #6
    I think of like manipulating the flow of air with the shape of the tube, like adding extra lift.
     
  8. Mar 8, 2015 #7

    DaveC426913

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    Would it provide an advantage over the typical wing surfaces usually used? Enough to offset the disadvantages?
     
  9. Mar 13, 2015 #8

    FactChecker

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    There are a cases where some air flow is diverted through the fuselage for beneficial effects. It can be used to delay separation from the wing or to avoid having too much air going through the engine. But it is done for specific reasons like those.

    There were early biplanes. In this era of lift bodies, maybe there could be a "biplane" version of a lifting body. I don't know what the advantage would be, but there are all types of strange things being investigated these days.
     
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