Is Joon-Hwi Kim's idea of graphical notation for vector calc any good?

In summary, the conversation discusses the novelty and potential benefits of using graphical notation in mathematics, as well as the development of Symonyi variable naming notation in programming. The speakers mention the usefulness of Venn diagrams in representing set relationships and how mathematicians have extended this notation. They also touch on the preference for differential forms notation in general relativity and the reason for the development of Symonyi notation.
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swampwiz
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I think its pretty novel and unique. Sometimes graphical notation can tease out some key insight that can be seen in algebraic notation. In this case, we'' just have to see what follow-on papers come out in support of it.

Consider how use Venn diagramming has become. It has its limits but is a great way to represent set relationships and mathematicians have extended the notation beyond the 2D representations we are taught.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Venn_diagram
One other such example while not graphical in nature is vector operations vs differential forms operations. GR folks utilize differential forms notation over tensor notation until it's time to do an actual numerical computation where the indices are needed to unpack the DF result into simpler expressions that are integrable or differentiable.

Also you need to understand the reason it was developed. In programming for example, Symonyi variable naming notation was quite popular in Windows programming as it carried the meaning of a variable in it name so you didn't have to keep returning to the declaration to figure out what operations would work on it. It also grouped variable by a common suffix.

Symonyi notation was developed because programmers didn't yet have the IDE (integrated development environment) tools that would understand programming context and variable usage.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hungarian_notation
 
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1. Is Joon-Hwi Kim's idea of graphical notation for vector calc original?

Yes, Joon-Hwi Kim's idea of graphical notation for vector calc is original. While there have been previous attempts at graphical notations for vector calculus, Kim's approach is unique and has not been proposed before.

2. How does Joon-Hwi Kim's graphical notation for vector calc compare to traditional notation?

Joon-Hwi Kim's graphical notation for vector calc is designed to be more intuitive and visually appealing compared to traditional notation. It uses diagrams and symbols to represent vector operations, making it easier to understand and remember.

3. Will Joon-Hwi Kim's graphical notation for vector calc be widely accepted in the scientific community?

It is difficult to predict whether Joon-Hwi Kim's graphical notation for vector calc will be widely accepted in the scientific community. However, it has received positive feedback from experts in the field and has the potential to become a popular alternative to traditional notation.

4. What are the potential benefits of using Joon-Hwi Kim's graphical notation for vector calc?

Some potential benefits of using Joon-Hwi Kim's graphical notation for vector calc include improved understanding and retention of vector calculus concepts, increased efficiency in solving problems, and potential for use in educational settings to enhance learning.

5. Are there any limitations to Joon-Hwi Kim's graphical notation for vector calc?

Like any notation system, Joon-Hwi Kim's graphical notation for vector calc may have limitations. Some may find it difficult to transition from traditional notation to this new approach, and it may not be suitable for all types of vector calculus problems. Further research and development may be needed to address any potential limitations.

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