Is Love Simply a Mathematical Equation?

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In summary, we discussed the topic of love and mathematics, particularly focusing on Edward Frenkel's book "Love and Math." The book delves into Frenkel's personal journey with mathematics and how he sees it as a form of love. We also discussed the book "The Art of Mathematics" by Jerry P. King, which also explores the beauty and aesthetics of mathematics. It is rare to find mathematicians writing about their field in an accessible way, but it is beneficial for non-mathematicians to gain a better understanding of why mathematicians do what they do.
  • #1
masters1
The only reason I don’t know more about love is because there just isn’t more to know. In fact, I’ve reduced love to a mathematical formula. "Let X be a non-singular complex projective manifold. Then every Hodge class on X is a linear combination with rational coefficients of the cohomology classes of complex subvarieties of X."

Actually, that’s not right. That’s the statement piece of the Hodge conjecture, but I’m sure you already knew that.
 
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  • #2
I will find the love of my life as soon as I can find a woman that can use the word "orthogonal" in casual conversation.

-Dan
 
  • #3
topsquark said:
I will find the love of my life as soon as I can find a woman that can use the word "orthogonal" in casual conversation.

-Dan

That's hilarious.
 
  • #4
This makes me want to ask what everyone thinks about Edward Frenkels love and math shenanigans. As i know, he is an exceptional mathematician, but he seems to really have a thing to say about Love and Math. What do you think?
 
  • #5
Joppy said:
This makes me want to ask what everyone thinks about Edward Frenkels love and math shenanigans. As i know, he is an exceptional mathematician, but he seems to really have a thing to say about Love and Math. What do you think?

Love is something for neuroscientists to address, who are applied chemists, who are applied physicists, who are applied mathematicians...so I think mathematicians really don't have much to say about love at this point. :D
 
  • #6
MarkFL said:
Love is something for neuroscientists to address, who are applied chemists, who are applied physicists, who are applied mathematicians...so I think pure mathematicians really don't have much to say about love at this point. :D

Haha yes. Good point. Agree.
 
  • #7
MarkFL said:
Love is something for neuroscientists to address, who are applied chemists, who are applied physicists, who are applied mathematicians...so I think mathematicians really don't have much to say about love at this point. :D
Hey! I'm a theorist. Nothing I do can be applied!

-Dan
 
  • #8
Joppy said:
This makes me want to ask what everyone thinks about Edward Frenkel's love and math shenanigans. As I know, he is an exceptional mathematician, but he seems to really have a thing to say about Love and Math. What do you think?

I've read that book. I'm currently re-reading it, in fact. I thought it was tremendously good. It's not really about romantic love, but much more about a love for mathematics - mathematics in all its glorious beauty. I read the book for the first time right after reading The Art of Mathematics, by Jerry P. King, another fantastic book I would recommend to anyone. It's rare to find articulate mathematicians willing to write about mathematics. Most of them are too busy actually doing mathematics. But it is good for the layman to understand why mathematicians do what they do (as King wrote, it is for aesthetic reasons, and Frenkel would definitely agree).
 
  • #9
Ackbach said:
I've read that book. I'm currently re-reading it, in fact. I thought it was tremendously good. It's not really about romantic love, but much more about a love for mathematics - mathematics in all its glorious beauty.

I totally agree. One of the reasons i really enjoyed the book is due to the way Frenkel has written it. In my eyes, the book is simultaneously a bibliography of Frenkels life, and also filled with fairly detailed mathematical discovery.

It's great to be able to read another persons life account, along with the mathematics that they and those around them discovered.

And yes, it is not until the final chapters that love is mentioned in a more 'mysterious' sort of way. In fact the book never gave me the impression that it was about romantic love, it is only Frenkels appearance in videos online that gave me that lead me to that.

Ackbach said:
I read the book for the first time right after reading The Art of Mathematics, by Jerry P. King, another fantastic book I would recommend to anyone.

Thank you for this recommendation.

Ackbach said:
It's rare to find articulate mathematicians willing to write about mathematics. Most of them are too busy actually doing mathematics. But it is good for the layman to understand why mathematicians do what they do (as King wrote, it is for aesthetic reasons, and Frenkel would definitely agree).

This is coherent with G. H. Hardy's opening words in A Mathematician's Apology,

It is a melancholy experience for a professional mathematician to
find himself writing about mathematics. The function of a
mathematician is to do something, to prove new theorems, to add
to mathematics, and not to talk about what he or other mathematicians
have done.
 
  • #10
I thought the love equation was \(\displaystyle r=a(1-sin\theta)\)
 
  • #11
Ackbach said:
I've read that book. I'm currently re-reading it, in fact. I thought it was tremendously good. It's not really about romantic love, but much more about a love for mathematics - mathematics in all its glorious beauty. I read the book for the first time right after reading The Art of Mathematics, by Jerry P. King, another fantastic book I would recommend to anyone. It's rare to find articulate mathematicians willing to write about mathematics. Most of them are too busy actually doing mathematics. But it is good for the layman to understand why mathematicians do what they do (as King wrote, it is for aesthetic reasons, and Frenkel would definitely agree).

Thanks again for this recommendation. I purchased it online as i read your post, it arrived this week and i just finished it. A good book indeed.

Its made me realize how important it is to read expository material on ones field of interest. I even think that undergraduates would benefit greatly from reading such material, enabling them to understand what their major is actually about (not just expositions on math, but other subjects too).
 

1. What is the mathematical equation for love?

The concept of love cannot be reduced to a single mathematical equation. While many scientists have attempted to study love from a mathematical perspective, it is a complex phenomenon that cannot be fully explained by numbers and equations.

2. Can love be quantified and measured?

Some aspects of love, such as physical attraction and attachment, can be measured through various psychological and physiological tests. However, the subjective experience of love and its emotional aspects cannot be quantified or measured with precision.

3. Is there a specific formula for finding true love?

No, there is no specific formula for finding true love. While some may argue that compatibility and shared values play a role in successful relationships, love is a multi-faceted concept that cannot be reduced to a simple formula.

4. Can love be predicted using mathematical models?

Some scientists have attempted to create mathematical models to predict the success or failure of relationships. However, love is a dynamic and unpredictable force, and it is not possible to accurately predict its outcome using mathematical models.

5. Is love purely a result of chemical reactions in the brain?

While certain chemicals and hormones, such as dopamine, oxytocin, and serotonin, play a role in our experience of love, it is not solely a result of these chemical reactions. Love also involves complex psychological and social factors that cannot be explained by chemistry alone.

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