1. Limited time only! Sign up for a free 30min personal tutor trial with Chegg Tutors
    Dismiss Notice
Dismiss Notice
Join Physics Forums Today!
The friendliest, high quality science and math community on the planet! Everyone who loves science is here!

Is rotational inertia an intrinsic property of an object?

  1. Jul 19, 2016 #1
    1. The problem statement, all variables and given/known data
    Is rotational inertia an intrinsic property of an object?



    2. Relevant equations


    3. The attempt at a solution
    So I know that rotational inertia is a property of an object that deals with a resistance to a change in the state of rotational motion but is it an intrinsic property? I wouldn't have thought that it was intrinsic because it deals with something that changes outside of any object.
    any help is appreciated.
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Jul 19, 2016 #2

    haruspex

    User Avatar
    Science Advisor
    Homework Helper
    Gold Member
    2016 Award

    Look up the definition, e.g. https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Intrinsic_and_extrinsic_properties
     
  4. Jul 19, 2016 #3
  5. Jul 19, 2016 #4
    is it intrinsic because its the object itself that has the rotational inertia ?
     
  6. Jul 19, 2016 #5

    haruspex

    User Avatar
    Science Advisor
    Homework Helper
    Gold Member
    2016 Award

    No, it seems you do not understand the meanings of intrinsic and extrinsic in physics.
    The density of a material is an intrinsic property; the mass of an object made of the material is an extrinsic property.
    Read the link I posted.
     
  7. Jul 19, 2016 #6

    CWatters

    User Avatar
    Science Advisor
    Homework Helper

    +1

    Basically they are asking if the moment of inertia of an object is an intrinsic property of an object. Read the link haruspex posted and decide if the moment of inertia of an object is an intrinsic property or not.
     
  8. Jul 20, 2016 #7
    so i have read that article and i understand that an intrinsic property is a property that isnt changed and is there no matter the amount of material or if it is a different piece or only part of an object like density, so i dont think that rotational inertia is an intrinsic property, i dont see how it could be?
     
  9. Jul 20, 2016 #8

    haruspex

    User Avatar
    Science Advisor
    Homework Helper
    Gold Member
    2016 Award

    That's right. It is an extrinsic property, because it is a property of the body as a whole, not a property possessed by every part of the body independently.
     
Know someone interested in this topic? Share this thread via Reddit, Google+, Twitter, or Facebook

Have something to add?
Draft saved Draft deleted