Is the Measurement Apparatus made up partly of electrons? Perhaps not.

In summary, the conversation is discussing the relationship between quantum theory and microscopy, specifically regarding the measurement problem and the nature of measurement apparatus. One perspective is that the apparatus is made up of classical macroscopic objects, while another suggests it is made up of quantum microscopic objects. However, according to quantum mechanics, it is not possible to say definitively that the measurement apparatus is made up of electrons. At the most fundamental level, all matter is made up of quarks, leptons, and bosons, but the challenge is understanding how the behavior of matter at a larger scale can be derived from this fundamental knowledge. This is a complex topic in theoretical physics.
  • #36
lucas_ said:
If I can show you that that it is possible to initiate some kind of ordering or coherency among individual water molecules without changing the temperature, or showing that it is possible to change the inter-molecular structure of liquid water. Is our QFT or QM still sufficient to describe it by perhaps adding extra hamiltonian of some kind?

Theories don't have to account for nonexistent events.

lucas_ said:
Let's say it's a good example.

You don't get to just help yourself to fanciful examples.

lucas_ said:
if they are all quantum objects, perhaps some global quantum effects can be recovered?

If you can find experimental evidence of such a thing, we can discuss it. But there's no point in just making up hypotheticals out of thin air.
 
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  • #37
This thread has degenerated into speculation and is now closed.
 
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