Is there a certain material that absorbs X-Rays so that the X-Rays don't escape

  1. Is there a certain material that absorbs X-Rays so that the X-Rays don't escape. Or rather, is there a material that stops the X-Rays from continuing. If there is such a material, is there a way to change the X-Ray into an electrical current?
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Mar 17, 2011
  2. jcsd
  3. Astronuc

    Staff: Mentor

    Re: X-Rays

    Yes - the higher the atomic number, Z, which is also the number of electrons surrounding the nucleus, the more electrons there are to scatter X-rays. Atomic density is another factor - more atoms/electrons per unit volume.

    The proposed mechanism implies the photoelectric effect. The X-rays would knock electrons off one electrode to the other. The charge separation would produce a voltage. As long as the electrons pass through the load, rather than jump back across the gap, then one could have power supply.

    However, one must consider how the X-rays are to be produced, and how much energy is required. Radioactive decay might work.

    Then one has to consider that X-rays are penetrating, so they may knock around electrons within the volume of the electron, rather than from the surface.
     
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