Is there any way to prove Newton's law

In summary, Newton's law states that: F=m.a. However, this law belongs to our sense and may be known by someone with more knowledge in the field. If you have any explanation or proof, please let me know.
  • #1
vi vu
1
0
a Newton's law states that : F=m.a , but I realize that it belongs to our sense , but may be someone know more about this . if you have any explanation or proof , let me know :)
 
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  • #2
vi vu said:
a Newton's law states that : F=m.a , but I realize that it belongs to our sense , but may be someone know more about this . if you have any explanation or proof , let me know :)

Forget about Newton's laws. Think about how you "prove" anything in science!

There is no such thing as "proof" as rigorous as that in mathematics, i.e. a logical proof. There are such a thing as "valid" evidence! The fact that your house still stands is an evidence for the validity of Newton's laws. The fact that we can actually map and predict the location of celestical bodies (i.e. we shoot a space capsule here on earth, and months and years later, actually reach a planet that wasn't at that location months and years earlier) is another evidence for the validity of Newton's laws.

Zz.
 
  • #3
Ofcourse you can. Just say that gravity is entropic.
 
  • #4
ZapperZ said:
Forget about Newton's laws. Think about how you "prove" anything in science!

There is no such thing as "proof" as rigorous as that in mathematics, i.e. a logical proof. There are such a thing as "valid" evidence! The fact that your house still stands is an evidence for the validity of Newton's laws. The fact that we can actually map and predict the location of celestical bodies (i.e. we shoot a space capsule here on earth, and months and years later, actually reach a planet that wasn't at that location months and years earlier) is another evidence for the validity of Newton's laws.

Zz.

What this guy said.

In logic,
there are direct proofs (if a goes to b and b goes to c then a goes to c),
proofs by contradiction (you assume the opposite of what you want to prove, then work to find the contradiction in that),
and proofs by induction (Tricky to explain in a single line. look this one up.)
You can look those up.

The types of proof that are not valid that are constantly used are:

Proof by superiority = "The King said the sun is blue.. so the sun is blue." The story of "the emporer has no clothes" is a story that attempts to explain to children that this is not proof.

Proof by Precident.
"We have been doing this for 25 years this way... "
It could have been wrong for 25 years... or incomplete, but if that is all you knew, then that's all you knew.
 
  • #5
Tell me if I’m wrong. The formula f=ma is a definition of force. You can’t prove a definition. You can ask, is it meaningful? I think it is not. Can you measure force? Well, if you can measure mass and if you can measure the acceleration then you can measure the force. Otherwise I don’t think you can. So I don’t understand Milgrom and I don’t understand Verlinde. What are they doing?
 
  • #6
H.B. said:
Can you measure force? Well, if you can measure mass and if you can measure the acceleration then you can measure the force. Otherwise I don’t think you can.

Ever seen a spring scale?
 

1. What is Newton's law and why is it important?

Newton's law, also known as the Law of Universal Gravitation, states that any two objects in the universe attract each other with a force that is directly proportional to their masses and inversely proportional to the square of the distance between them. It is important because it explains the motion of objects and is the basis for our understanding of gravity.

2. How was Newton's law discovered?

Isaac Newton discovered his law of gravitation while studying the motion of objects in space. He observed that the same force that causes objects to fall on Earth also keeps the moon in its orbit and planets in their paths around the sun. He then formulated the mathematical equation that represents this law.

3. Can Newton's law be proven?

As with any scientific theory, it is impossible to prove Newton's law with absolute certainty. However, it has been extensively tested and has consistently been found to accurately predict the motion of objects in our universe. This gives us a high level of confidence in its validity.

4. Are there any exceptions to Newton's law?

On a macroscopic scale, Newton's law is accurate and has no known exceptions. However, on a microscopic scale, such as in the realm of quantum mechanics, it breaks down and does not accurately predict the behavior of particles. In this case, we rely on other theories to explain the motion of particles.

5. How does Einstein's theory of relativity relate to Newton's law?

Einstein's theory of relativity expanded upon Newton's law and provided a more accurate explanation of gravity. It takes into account the effects of time and space on the motion of objects, particularly at high speeds and in extreme gravitational fields. However, for most everyday situations, Newton's law is still a very useful and accurate approximation.

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