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Is there physics knowledge hidden to public domain?

  1. Aug 15, 2016 #1
    I was wondering if our governments hide us some knowledge. Military industry for sure, but What about physics?

    Is all the knowledge public?

    I include in my question biology. I am sure that the richest people in this planet are investing right now hundreds or thousands of billions researching how to be immortal and I'm sure they are not publishing obviously the results of these investigations.

    Science at this moment in time provides enough tools to investigate this topic: there are supercomputers able to calculate anything, and a massive biological and chemical knowledge.

    What do you think?
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Aug 15, 2016 #2

    russ_watters

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    Technology yes, pure science no - there is very little, if any, pure science that is outside the public domain. Pharmaceuticals hide the new compounds and gene sequences they are making early on in the investigation, but in order for a medicine to be approved they have to publicly test them (and by then, they have a patent application out). But the methods they use to make these things are in the public domain.

    Stealth technology was originally based on a Soviet research paper that the USSR might have censored if they realized what it would lead to. It spawned technology that was secret for probably a decade before others were able to start copying it.

    [edit] Also, "immortality" is too vague of a concept to be researched specifically and the more grounded lines of research (such as: why do we age?) are in the public domain.
     
    Last edited: Aug 15, 2016
  4. Aug 15, 2016 #3
    Regarding aging I think that this methods:

    http://bioviva-science.com/2016/04/24/anti-aging-gene-therapy-has-the-time-arrived-for-true-anti-aging-medicine/ [Broken]

    Probably are not the "cutting edge" technology, maybe there is something even better.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: May 8, 2017
  5. Aug 15, 2016 #4
    Well, if it's hidden, how would you expect to find out about it on internet?
     
  6. Aug 15, 2016 #5

    ZapperZ

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    This is neither here nor there.

    Coming back to the on-topic discussion, the answer is "No".

    Zz.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: May 8, 2017
  7. Aug 15, 2016 #6
    I don't expect to find about it, I expected to share my conspiracy theories with other paranoid folks just to have a good time.

    Ok.
     
  8. Aug 15, 2016 #7

    ZapperZ

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    Then you're at the wrong place. Those "other paranoid folks" have been banned or do not stay very long in this forum, due to this PF Rule that you had agreed to:

    So you may have to find your "good time" elsewhere.

    Zz.
     
  9. Aug 15, 2016 #8
    I was just kidding.

    I was curious about this topic. That is all.

    I am not telling things like man didn't go to the moon or something like that.
     
  10. Aug 15, 2016 #9

    Fervent Freyja

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    There aren't enough supercomputers available to deal with the overall back flow of data as it is. Most certainly cannot compute just anything. We aren't near understanding immortality when we aren't always sure of the exact mechanism/pathways that some pharmaceuticals act upon, we can know that many things just work, but not always how.

    Why are you worried about what other people might be doing instead of learning about what we actually know? Maybe your paranoia stems from not being aware of general available knowledge?
     
  11. Aug 27, 2016 #10
    The example that I have in mind is much of the rocket and liquid propellant research from the 50's through the '70s.
    There was great pressure to come up with ever more efficient oxidizers for mono-propellants. Much of this research was done by the military and they would keep their research confidential, at least until it was duplicated and published by an open civilian source.

    This is entertainingly documented in _Ignition_ by John D. Clark , an informal history of liquid propellant research. A fun book.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_Drury_Clark

    _Ignition_ by chapter
    http://mikea.ath.cx/Ignition/ [Broken]

    The whole thing:
    http://library.sciencemadness.org/library/books/ignition.pdf

    Print copy (expensive):
    http://www.abebooks.com/book-search/title/ignition/author/john-clark/

    --diogenesNY
     
    Last edited by a moderator: May 8, 2017
  12. Aug 27, 2016 #11

    berkeman

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    Conspiracy theories and related nonsense are not allowed at the PF.
     
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