Is This Circuit a Pull-Up or Pull-Down Configuration?

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  • Thread starter Ronaldo95163
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In summary, based on the circuit diagram and question, I think you may be having trouble with the inconsistency of the circuit or the unconventional drawing. I would suggest trying to point out the inconsistencies and explaining why they might cause confusion.
  • #1
Ronaldo95163
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1

Homework Statement


Based on a circuit diagram below

Homework Equations


None really

The Attempt at a Solution


So I was going through some past exams papers and encountered this question.
However at the top it says it's a Pull-down circuit.

Now I know that pull-down circuits utilize nmos transistors and pull-up circuits utilize pmos transistors, so the diagram coincides with that convention.
However the circuit is established between Vdd and the output...so it's setup as a pull-up circuit(atleast to me). So if it's a pull-up circuit then the soln would be basically to convert that diagram to Boolean form.

But if it is in fact pull-down circuit then the soln would be the dual of the above.

Which should I take it as in order to work out the soln.
Thanks in advance.
 

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  • #2
Tricky. I'd do the other questions in the exam first and come back to this one if I had time!

I think you have to point out that the circuit appears inconsistent or at least unconventional. If it's a pull-down then Vdd must be the lower voltage supply rail (0V) where as normally Vdd is the higher supply voltage (typically 5V). In addition circuits are conventionally drawn with the higher voltage rails at the top of the page and lower voltages at the bottom, so if this is a pull-down then it's been draw "upside down". On the other hand the FETs are shown as N-Type which would be consistent with a pull down.

I would hope that if you state your assumptions and solve it either way you should get the marks.
 
  • #3
Thanks man
I guess I would work with it assuming it's a pull down circuit.

This is a pretty stupid question to bring on a final exam btw :|
 
  • #4
How is it possible to implement a PMOS into a pull down circuit? :/
 

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  • #5
It can be done if the threshold voltage is small. If VB is constrained to be ≥ 0V then the lowest VF will go is 0V + VTH. If VB can go below 0V then VF can approach 0V.

PS: NMOS logic came before CMOS. NMOS used N-Type FETs as pull-up "resistors".
 
  • #6
Oh so the pull down cct in the second qn would just consist of the pmos transistor B?

But then that works out be not B and its not the dual of the pull up above...or am I approaching it wrong?
 
  • #7
Ronaldo95163 said:
Oh so the pull down cct in the second qn would just consist of the pmos transistor B?

I assume you mean Q1 rather than "transistor B".

There is also a pull down resistor shown in parallel with Q1.
 
  • #8
Yes Q1 sorry lol

So because of the two pull down resistors I'm assuming that the entire circuit is made up of two separate pull down ccts.
Going with this assumption... my soln is

(~Q3+~Q4+~Q5)*(Q1Q2)
 
  • #9
Two pull down resistors?

pmospulldown.png
 
Last edited:
  • #10
Ronaldo95163 said:
Going with this assumption... my soln is
(~Q3+~Q4+~Q5)*(Q1Q2)

I don't follow that. Instead of writing the logic expression in terms of Q1 to Q5 you should be using the inputs A,B and C.
 
  • #11
For the pull down networks...normally the soln is the NOT of the expression of the pull down network so going with the pic you sent...the circuit's final expression would be ~~B = B?

But then that wouldn't be the Dual of the pull up circuit...this is where I'm confused :(
 
  • #12
This is how I approached it...

I started by looking to see what had to happen to make F true (logic 1).

Looking at the pull down circuit it's clear that F can only be true if Q1 is off so B must be true. So the equation for F is going to start something like...

F = B AND (something else)

To make F true something must also pull it up (otherwise there is a resistor to pull it down/false). So I then looked at the pull up circuit to see what had to happen to pull F up. That gives you the "something else" expression. Have a think about that and the effect of the resistor in the pull up circuit. For example what happens if Q2 is off and Q5 is on? Is that sufficient to make F a logic 1?
 
  • #13
Ronaldo95163 said:
For the pull down networks...normally the soln is the NOT of the expression of the pull down network so going with the pic you sent...the circuit's final expression would be ~~B = B?

But then that wouldn't be the Dual of the pull up circuit...this is where I'm confused :(

Yes in this circuit the pull up and pull down are not duals/complimentary.
 

1. What is a pull up/pull down circuit?

A pull up/pull down circuit is an electronic circuit that is used to ensure a predictable voltage level for an input signal. It is typically used with digital logic circuits to prevent the input from floating and causing unpredictable behavior.

2. How does a pull up/pull down circuit work?

A pull up/pull down circuit works by connecting a resistor between the input signal and a power supply (for pull up) or ground (for pull down). This resistor pulls the input signal to a known voltage level, which helps to prevent the input from floating.

3. What is the purpose of using a pull up/pull down circuit?

The purpose of using a pull up/pull down circuit is to ensure reliable and consistent operation of digital logic circuits. Without a pull up/pull down circuit, the input signal may float and cause unpredictable behavior, leading to incorrect results.

4. What are the advantages of using a pull up/pull down circuit?

One of the main advantages of using a pull up/pull down circuit is that it helps to prevent the input signal from floating, which can cause unpredictable behavior. This ensures reliable operation of digital logic circuits. Additionally, pull up/pull down circuits are relatively simple and inexpensive to implement.

5. When should a pull up/pull down circuit be used?

A pull up/pull down circuit should be used whenever there is a risk of the input signal floating and causing unpredictable behavior in digital logic circuits. This is especially important for inputs that are not actively driven, such as push buttons, switches, or open collector outputs.

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