Laser Activated transparent ink?

In summary, the conversation is about finding a transparent ink that can be activated by heat or intense light, specifically a laser. The ink is supposed to be used on a coated surface, either metal or paper, and activated by a laser to create fine lines or drawings. The person is wondering if such an ink exists or if they can modify an ordinary ink to behave this way. They are also discussing the application of this ink on foam blocks and a multi-layered photonic crystal sheet. The idea of using dyes used for paper or Polaroid ZINK is brought up as a possible solution.
  • #1
20
0
Hello everyone,

I was just wondering if there is any type of transparent ink that could be permanently activated by heat or intense light (laser).

Preferably I am planning to use a laser light to activate the ink.

I am trying to coat a piece of metal (or paper or etc.) with this ink (which is invisible). Then I want to write on the coating using a laser light. I am supposed to shine a laser beam to the coating in order to draw fine lines/drawings. The laser beam is supposed to activate the ink (reveal its color) as it pass through. The laser is supposed to activate the color of the ink and lock it (meaning, the color is supposed to stay on coating after laser has passes through).

I was just wondering if this is possible and if there is an ink with this kind of characteristic or if I can modify an ordinary ink to behave like this.

Thanks
 
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  • #3
jjoll said:
Hello everyone,

I was just wondering if there is any type of transparent ink that could be permanently activated by heat or intense light (laser).

Preferably I am planning to use a laser light to activate the ink.

I am trying to coat a piece of metal (or paper or etc.) with this ink (which is invisible). Then I want to write on the coating using a laser light. I am supposed to shine a laser beam to the coating in order to draw fine lines/drawings. The laser beam is supposed to activate the ink (reveal its color) as it pass through. The laser is supposed to activate the color of the ink and lock it (meaning, the color is supposed to stay on coating after laser has passes through).

I was just wondering if this is possible and if there is an ink with this kind of characteristic or if I can modify an ordinary ink to behave like this.

Thanks
Can you describe the application?
 
  • #5
berkeman said:
Can you describe the application?
We have these white hard blocks of foams. Something like these ones:

http://www.cdxghm.com/View_en.aspx?id=123

The idea is to soak the surface of these blocks into our transparent solution (ink/dye + etc) and then use a laser to write/draw on the surface of these blocks and then let them dry.
 
  • #6
jjoll said:
We have these white hard blocks of foams. Something like these ones:

http://www.cdxghm.com/View_en.aspx?id=123

The idea is to soak the surface of these blocks into our transparent solution (ink/dye + etc) and then use a laser to write/draw on the surface of these blocks and then let them dry.
Why not just use a standard ink jet printer setup?
 
  • #7
berkeman said:
Why not just use a standard ink jet printer setup?
well let me be more precise. I am working on a college project and directly drawing on the foams is not exactly the point of this project. I am trying to develop a laser printing method in order to use on a sheet of multi-layered photonic crystal. I am going to use these foams to demonstrate a proof of concept to my prof. Imagine these foams to be covered with a thick plastic cover similar to:
https://www.amazon.com/dp/B00L27EPD8/?tag=pfamazon01-20
and we want our laser to go past through this layer and hit the sponge sheet. and write on the foam without damaging the top plastic layer.
I am coming up with these scenarios as I am writing this now. But what I am actually working on is: a sheet of polymer based paper that is made of 4 layers and I am trying to write/engrave on the surface of second layer so the plan is to some how inject the solution to the second layer and then emit the laser from the top (laser is supposed to go past first layer) and then write on the surface of second layer.
 
Last edited by a moderator:
  • #8
jjoll said:
I need a solution (dye/ink/...). Paper is not what I am looking for. thanks
Can't you use the same kind of dyes they use for the paper?
 
  • #9
DrClaude said:
Can't you use the same kind of dyes they use for the paper?
hmm this is really interesting idea. From the wikipedia link that you gave me, I read something about Polaroid ZINK that is used on the thermal papers. this might work. I need to think about this more. thanks
 

What is laser activated transparent ink?

Laser activated transparent ink is a type of ink that is activated by a laser, meaning it changes color or becomes visible when exposed to a laser beam. It is often used for security purposes, such as creating invisible markings that can only be seen with a specific laser.

How does laser activated transparent ink work?

Laser activated transparent ink contains special pigments or dyes that are sensitive to certain wavelengths of laser light. When the ink is exposed to the laser, the pigments or dyes absorb the light and emit a visible color or fluorescence that is different from the ink's original color.

What are the applications of laser activated transparent ink?

Laser activated transparent ink has a variety of applications, including security and anti-counterfeiting measures, as well as artistic and decorative purposes. It can be used on documents, packaging, artwork, and even clothing.

Is laser activated transparent ink safe?

Yes, laser activated transparent ink is generally safe to use. However, it is important to follow proper handling and storage instructions as some formulations may contain chemicals that could be harmful if ingested or inhaled. It is also important to use appropriate safety precautions when working with lasers.

Are there any limitations to laser activated transparent ink?

One limitation of laser activated transparent ink is that it requires a specific wavelength of laser light to activate, so it may not work with all types of lasers. Additionally, the color change or fluorescence may fade over time with exposure to light or other environmental factors.

Suggested for: Laser Activated transparent ink?

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