Laser beams in the frequency range of of microwaves

In summary, the conversation discusses the possibility of using maser beams, or laser beams in the frequency range of microwaves, on conducting mediums such as tissue. The individual raises questions about the potential effects of the beams, including heating and the emission of electromagnetic radiation. They also mention the use of thin gold layers as a means of containing the beams.
  • #1
lost_in_space
17
0
Hello people,

i have got a few thoughts which i would like to share.

I few month ago i foundout that there are laser beams in the frequency range of of microwaves (maser beams). (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Maser)

I consider the following situation: If a conducting medium (lets think of tissue here) is hit by a maser beam which crosses it (let us assume that skin depht is quite lare) what will happen ?

I believe, first of all, that the free electrons inside our conducting medium (and within the beam) will be forced to oscillate since they are influenced by an alternating electric and magnetic field: in my opinion this should produce two effects:

1) heating

2) schouldn't the electrons emitt electromagnetic radiation. Would this radiation be of the same frequency as the beam that causes it ? If yes, the generated radiation should be possible to propagate out of the tissue again (since it has the same frequency and therefore has large skin depth)

this are my thoughts, i would be greatful for comments.
 
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  • #2


I don't know what you mean by 'skin depth', but your microwave oven is full of microwaves. There's a screen in the window to keep the microwaves from leaking out, which I assume keeps the energy leakage to a safe level. I haven't seen any microwave ovens with transparent, thin, gold coated windows--or maybe I haven't been paying attention.

Would a thin gold layer suffice for your requirements of tissue thin?
 

1. What is the difference between laser beams and microwaves?

Laser beams are concentrated beams of light that are coherent and have a specific wavelength, while microwaves are a type of electromagnetic radiation with longer wavelengths and lower frequencies. Laser beams can be used for precision cutting or medical procedures, while microwaves are commonly used for cooking or communication.

2. How are laser beams in the microwave frequency range used in science?

Laser beams in the microwave frequency range, also known as masers, are used in various scientific fields such as astrophysics, quantum computing, and nuclear magnetic resonance imaging. They can also be used for precise timekeeping and measuring small changes in physical properties.

3. Can laser beams in the microwave frequency range be harmful to humans?

Yes, laser beams in the microwave frequency range can be harmful to humans if exposed to high levels for extended periods of time. They can cause tissue damage and burns. However, most modern laser systems have safety measures in place to prevent harm to humans.

4. How are laser beams in the microwave frequency range produced?

Laser beams in the microwave frequency range are produced by passing a beam of electrons through a material with a specific energy level. This interaction causes the electrons to release energy in the form of photons, creating a coherent beam of light at the desired microwave frequency.

5. Are there any practical applications for laser beams in the microwave frequency range?

Yes, there are many practical applications for laser beams in the microwave frequency range. They are used in telecommunications, radar systems, satellite communication, and even in everyday devices like microwave ovens. They are also being researched for potential use in wireless power transmission and advanced imaging technologies.

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