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Learning outside of the classroom

  1. Feb 12, 2008 #1
    So I have this question, and while I may not be in a position to apply it now, it is something I'm curious about. But for you guys who've already graduated and are engineers and have been for some time, how do you motivate yourself to keep learning? What sources do you utilize for these purposes? I just have a hard time visualizing anyone reading a textbook without someone forcing them to.
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Feb 13, 2008 #2

    symbolipoint

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    You find your limitations when you work in a job. You then decide to professionally develop yourself; the methods can generally be self-directed study, or attending more coursework.
     
  4. Feb 13, 2008 #3

    stewartcs

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    I generally find that I'm the one forcing me to read!

    Once you start working, and assuming you want to actually do a good job, you'll find that you must read books (typically reference books) to do your job. You are not going to remember every formula you learned so you'll need a reference at the least for that.

    As far as learning new material...it goes back to you have the desire.

    CS
     
  5. Feb 13, 2008 #4

    Defennder

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    What kind of reference books would you be reading as engineers? They're not like theory-laden textbooks of engineering courses but more of dry engineering catalog specifications or operating manual types right?
     
  6. Feb 13, 2008 #5

    stewartcs

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    Yes and no. A lot handbooks offer a brief theoretical overview of what the formulas actually mean, or derive a simple case. Sometimes they do offer a bit more of the theory, it just depends on the book and if the subuject warrants more of an explaination.

    Catalogs are just that...catalogs.

    I've never seen an operating manual with any kind of theory in it.

    CS
     
  7. Feb 13, 2008 #6
    Right now I'm reading Palmgren's Ball and Roller Bearing Engineering. Last week it was the Bodine Small Motor, Gearmotor, and Control Handbook. For me, it almost always depends on what I need to know at that point in time or what's new that I might have some use for.
     
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