Lorentz Contraction and Mass Distortion Calculation- Did I do this right?

In summary, the conversation discusses the Lorentz contraction and mass distortion effect in physics and the speaker's calculation of these effects on their dog, Little Ann, if she were to be sped up to relativistic speeds. The speaker asks for confirmation on their calculations and also questions why acceleration would be harmful to their dog. It is clarified that a constant velocity would not harm the dog, but excessive acceleration could potentially be harmful.
  • #1
Liger20
65
0
Hello, I recently learned of the Lorentz contraction and mass distortion effect in a physics
book, and for the sheer heck of it, I decided to see what it would be like if my dog, Little
Ann, were sped up to relativistic speeds. I decided to try to calculate it using the equations
provided by the book I was using. I’m pretty sure that I’ve done this right, but I would like to be 100% sure, so I’d really appreciate it if someone could tell me whether or not I’ve done these calculations correctly.

Little Ann weighs about 63 pounds. She is about 39 inches long, give or take about two inches (she wiggled a lot when I measured her). Since the equations have to be in meters, let's convert 39 inches into .9906 meters. I wanted to see what it would be like if Little Ann were sped up to 99.9 percent the speed of light (ignoring the fact that speeds that high would kill her).

So I took the equation for Lorentz contraction:

L=(1-u^2)^½

=(1-.999^2)^½

= (.0447101778)(.9906)

=.0442899021 meters

=1.743697 +/- 2 inches


So Lorentz contraction would make her around 1.74 inches long +/- about two inches. ( I know that’s not very precise, but it was the best I could do given that she is so hyperactive.)

Then I calculated mass distortion:

M=(1-.999^2)^-½

M=22.4

(63 lbs)(22.36627204)=1409.075139 lbs.
Again, I’m pretty sure I did this right, but I would appreciate it if someone could verify that everything is correct.
 
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  • #2
Looks OK to me.

(FYI: High speeds won't kill her--but the acceleration might.)
 
  • #3
Okay, thanks a lot!

Why would the acceleration kill her?
 
  • #4
If you give her too great an acceleration, you might crush her. But the main point is that a constant velocity won't affect her, no matter how fast it is. (Consider that right now you're moving pretty fast with respect to something. Feel any different?)
 

Related to Lorentz Contraction and Mass Distortion Calculation- Did I do this right?

1. What is the Lorentz Contraction and Mass Distortion Calculation?

The Lorentz Contraction and Mass Distortion Calculation is a mathematical formula used in special relativity to calculate the change in length and mass of an object as it moves at high speeds.

2. How does the Lorentz Contraction and Mass Distortion Calculation work?

The calculation takes into account the velocity of the object and the speed of light to determine the amount of contraction and distortion that occurs.

3. How do I know if I have done the calculation correctly?

To ensure accuracy, it is important to carefully follow the formula and double check your calculations. You can also compare your results to accepted values for known objects.

4. What are the units used in the Lorentz Contraction and Mass Distortion Calculation?

The units used in the calculation will depend on the units used for the velocity and mass of the object. However, the final result will always be in meters (for length) and kilograms (for mass).

5. Can the Lorentz Contraction and Mass Distortion Calculation be applied to any object?

Yes, the calculation can be applied to any object moving at high speeds. However, it is most significant for objects moving at speeds close to the speed of light.

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