Magnetic Field From Coiled Wires

  • Thread starter KrizG
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  • #1
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I'm just curious why solenoids used to create a magnetic field, such as those used in electric motors are typically coils of thin copper wires with a dielectric separating each turn of wire instead of using a single cylindrical shell made of solid copper. Wouldn't using a cylinder shell made entirely of copper be more effective? Because of the decreased length, there would be much less electric resistance, and I believe the magnetic field would remain the same if the current density flowing through it were the same.
 
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  • #2
Matterwave
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In a solenoid, the current flows in circles, slowly spiraling towards the other side. How can you get that behavior if you used a cylinder? The current would just move straight through, and then you get a magnetic field that's not in the direction you want.
 

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