Magnetic fields in a vacuum

  • B
  • Thread starter pete94857
  • Start date
  • Tags
    Magnet field
  • #1
pete94857
23
2
TL;DR Summary
Magnetic fields in space
Hello,

How does a vacuum effect the distance a d intensity of a magnetic field ?

I've look elsewhere but found conflicting information.
 
Physics news on Phys.org
  • #2
Can you list a couple of your references, and point out how they are in conflict? Thanks.
 
  • Like
Likes Vanadium 50 and pete94857
  • #3
I googled the question and various sites came up and I looked at them. I would say they did not seem to be the types of sites to accept knowledge.

Some say the field would not be affected in strength but the distance the field would travel from the source would be reduced meaning the field would be more compressed to the surface.

Other sources claimed no effect at all.

One source claimed it would not be able to exist in a vacuum.

From my own knowledge. I already know the field will exist in a vacuum, I've taken an interest in the LHC etc. I know the what I would call the medium surrounding the source does make a difference, thinking of magnetic reluctance.

But thinking of reluctance I'm unsure about a vacuum because logically there's zero reluctance. So logically to what I understand the field would extend further. But I'm unsure of the intensity through the distance. I.e 1 radius 4 times less etc
 
  • #4
pete94857 said:
Other sources claimed no effect at all.
That is correct.

pete94857 said:
One source claimed it would not be able to exist in a vacuum.
That is nonsense, so I'd suggest you stay away from that website in the future. :smile:
 
  • Like
Likes Vanadium 50
  • #5
Magnetic fields in vacuum are the reference medium.
The presence of air does not make a difference to the magnetic field.
What other materials are you considering?
 
  • Like
Likes pete94857
  • #6
BTW, remember that light and other Electromagenetic (EM) radiation consists of oscillating electric field and magnetic field waves. They propagate through a vacuum just fine. :wink:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Light

1719259717977.png
 
  • Like
Likes pete94857
  • #7
  • Like
Likes berkeman
  • #8
Baluncore said:
Magnetic fields in vacuum are the reference medium.
The presence of air does not make a difference to the magnetic field.
What other materials are you considering?
Various gases. Hydrogen, oxygen I know both react differently with the field.

Thank you, I get it now.
 
  • #9
OP's question has been answered, so this thread will be tied off now. Thanks
 
  • Like
Likes pete94857

Similar threads

Replies
1
Views
644
Replies
3
Views
475
  • Other Physics Topics
Replies
31
Views
3K
Replies
11
Views
1K
  • Other Physics Topics
Replies
17
Views
3K
  • Other Physics Topics
Replies
11
Views
576
Replies
8
Views
934
  • Other Physics Topics
Replies
3
Views
1K
  • Other Physics Topics
2
Replies
39
Views
2K
  • Other Physics Topics
Replies
2
Views
1K
Back
Top