Magnitude of Electric Field problem

In summary, the problem involves finding the magnitude of the electric field at position C, given the charges q+ve=2.01 nC and q-ve=-2.01 nC, and distances d1=3.28 cm and d2=6.56 cm. The equation E=E1+E2 is used, where E1=kq/r and E2=kq/r, and the components of the electric field are found using trigonometry. However, there is confusion over the meaning of q+ve and q-ve, as well as the distances d1 and d2. Further clarification is needed to solve the problem accurately.
  • #1
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Homework Statement


If q+ve=2.01 nC, q-ve=-2.01 nC, d1=3.28 cm, and d2=6.56 cm, what is the magnitude of the electric field at the position C?


Homework Equations



E=E1 + E2 E1=kq/r E2=kq/r

The Attempt at a Solution



I still can't get this, any help please

this is what I've done so far -- if u notice what I am doing wrong pleaseeeeee point it out

first, i got E from Q1 using kq/r (squared) = 1.68E7
then i got E from Q2 using kq/r (squared) -- found r using a squared+b squared= c
squared

then i started on getting the x and y components of each.
we know E from Q1 is only x component, and so x = 1.68E7 while y=0

E2 is at an angle
(i think i might be doing this part wrong) = sin angle = d2/r (found above) , angle is 63
degrees

x component of E2= E2cos63
y component of E2= E2sin63

now i add the two x together (E1)+ (-e2) and I have the neg Y

then i use phyth. theorm to get r in N/C

what am i doing wrong ?

(i then went back and unsquared all my r values for kq/rSquared into kq/r and it still don't work)
 
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  • #2
Mabey It's just me, but I don't get the problem.
What is "q+ve"? (I know it's a charge but what kind, I don't understand the +/- ve)
Also, what are d1 and d2? Distances from what?
Does the point c have a special location like any axis, or is it just any point c?
 
  • #3
q+ve=2.01 nC, q-ve=-2.01 nC - Sorta looks like a dipole, but I don't really understand the problem either...
 

What is the magnitude of electric field?

The magnitude of electric field is a measure of the strength of an electric field at a specific point in space. It is a scalar quantity and is typically measured in units of volts per meter (V/m).

How do you calculate the magnitude of electric field?

The magnitude of electric field can be calculated using the formula E = F/q, where E is the electric field strength, F is the force exerted on a test charge q, and q is the magnitude of the test charge. Alternatively, it can also be calculated using Coulomb's Law, which states that the electric field strength is directly proportional to the product of the charges and inversely proportional to the square of the distance between them.

What factors affect the magnitude of electric field?

The magnitude of electric field is affected by several factors, including the distance between charges, the magnitude of the charges, and the medium in which the charges are located. The presence of other charges in the vicinity can also affect the magnitude of electric field.

Why is the magnitude of electric field important?

The magnitude of electric field is important in understanding the behavior of electric charges and their interactions. It is also crucial in many applications, such as in the design of electronic devices and in studying the properties of materials.

What are some common units for measuring the magnitude of electric field?

Some common units for measuring the magnitude of electric field include volts per meter (V/m), newtons per coulomb (N/C), and joules per coulomb (J/C). In some cases, electric field strength may also be expressed in terms of electron volts (eV) or kilovolts per meter (kV/m).

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