Making an Armature from scratch

  • #1
Summary:
Making an Armature from scratch.
Im new to electrical engineering and wanted to make an Armature from scratch, if anyone knows the parts or an estimated cost of the item that would be appreciated. Thank you.
 

Answers and Replies

  • #2
anorlunda
Staff Emeritus
Insights Author
9,329
6,352
:welcome:
Armature usually means the rotating part of a dynamo or motor or generator. ( Although it's possible to do it inside out.)

To be useful, the armature needs to be matched with a stator (the part that doesn't rotate.) What size and type of stator do you have? Usually, there is a nameplate on the stator. A photo of that nameplate would be helpful.
 
  • Like
Likes FreddieAzoth
  • #3
Currently I do not have any sort of equipment including a stator, but I shall look into how to get one. Thanks
 
  • #4
DaveC426913
Gold Member
19,327
2,800
We made electrical motors as a project in High School.

I made mine out of Bic pens wound with copper wire. (Note: do not use Bic pens - or any kind of soft plastic - as the core of your winding coils!)

I was impressed when my academically-inclined (ex)-girlfriend produced her own tiny electric motor made out of paper clips. It was no bigger than a deck of cards!


Moral of the story: your options are nigh-unlimited. It can be as large and as costly or as small and cheap as you desire.
 
  • Like
Likes FreddieAzoth
  • #5
anorlunda
Staff Emeritus
Insights Author
9,329
6,352
Currently I do not have any sort of equipment including a stator, but I shall look into how to get one. Thanks
OK. It might be better to describe your project as building a motor. Forget the words armature and stator.

Are you thinking of a small DC motor that serves only to demonstrate the principle,
or do you want a big motor powerful enough to drive big machines?

If you want the small motor, this link describes how to do it using items in your house.

https://www.instructables.com/5-Minute-DIY-Motor/
 
  • #6
Yes im thinking of a small motor, and thanks for the link.
 
  • #7
Klystron
Gold Member
836
1,217
For simplicity consider making an electromagnet first then progress to solenoids, electric motors, armatures, rotors and stators. A simple electromagnet helps you learn basics of winding and directing EM (electromagnetic) fields. You can salvage parts from old appliances, phones, toys and other projects.
Cost = price of battery.

Wind insulated wire such as copper wire covered with plastic around a soft iron cylinder, called the core. A large nail, bolt or old tool of the correct material works.
Strip the insulation from the ends of the wire. Hold the bare ends to a small DC battery.

Do the ends of the core attract small metal objects such as a paper clip or iron filings?

Once successful, you can add refinements such as switches, a circuit board, and battery pack. Experiment with adding more windings in different patterns, adding more batteries in series or in parallel and gauge the effects on the EM field you created by how it attracts small ferrous metal objects.

Once you master winding electromagnets, you will understand the basics of making motors.
 
  • #8
2,320
664
Armature usually means the rotating part of a dynamo or motor or generator.
I think we need some distinctions between AC and DC machines here. Certainly in my own experience with 3 phase power, the armature is on the stator while the DC field is on the rotor.
 
  • #9
Averagesupernova
Science Advisor
Gold Member
3,834
762
I'm not sure the definition of armature is nailed down as well as some terms are. As a rule, it is considered necessary to move to be called an armature, and have conductor(s) carrying current. But, we generally don't consider the rotor in an automotive alternator an armature and I cannot see why not. It carries DC while a Wikipedia article claims the conductors must carry AC to be considered an armature. The stator in an automotive alternator is not considered the field for more obvious reasons since it is the source of electrical power we are generating. The rotor is what performs the field function in the automotive alternator.
-
Now, all that being said, I seem to recall the part that is attached to the clapper on an old fashioned electric bell that is attracted by the electromagnet is called an armature. So, technically, the part that moves with contacts on a relay could be called an armature.
 
  • #11
tech99
Gold Member
2,084
760
OK. It might be better to describe your project as building a motor. Forget the words armature and stator.

Are you thinking of a small DC motor that serves only to demonstrate the principle,
or do you want a big motor powerful enough to drive big machines?

If you want the small motor, this link describes how to do it using items in your house.

https://www.instructables.com/5-Minute-DIY-Motor/
I have used version of this one in school for pupils from about 10 years up with great success. It is built on a little wooden baseboard and uses enamelled wire. . Notice the correct way to scrape the enamel off the wire to form the commutator. The pupils also make electric bells and a steady-hand game on the same baseboard, which has many wood screw holes for various purposes.
 
  • Like
Likes Klystron and anorlunda
  • #12
2,320
664
For rotating electrical machines, I would suggest that the terms "rotor" and "stator" are less prone to ambiguity. This describes the component in terms of its motion (or lack of motion).
 
  • Like
Likes Klystron, anorlunda, Averagesupernova and 1 other person

Related Threads on Making an Armature from scratch

  • Last Post
Replies
3
Views
3K
  • Last Post
2
Replies
33
Views
3K
Replies
8
Views
5K
Replies
2
Views
2K
Replies
51
Views
5K
  • Last Post
Replies
1
Views
607
  • Last Post
Replies
4
Views
962
Replies
24
Views
4K
  • Last Post
Replies
3
Views
2K
Replies
12
Views
2K
Top