Best way to heat up metal plates?

In summary, electric cartridge heaters are a popular way to heat heavy dies. Chromalox and Watlow are two well known brands. Omega also sells cartridge heaters. Omega also sells controllers to control the heaters. I have had good experience buying from Omega.
  • #1
Hey there! I want to make a rosin press from scratch.
I have a big press with 2 inch thick metal plates, probably about 4 inches wide and 10 inches long.
I need to heat these plates up to 230 degrees Fahrenheit and press them against each other with product in between them.
I am going to fasten the plates onto the press, which is also metal, but I need to know how to heat the plates to a specific temperature.
Any help is greatly appreciated. :)
(Note: I am very new to engineering.)
 
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  • #2
Electric cartridge heaters are a popular way to heat heavy dies. Chromalox and Watlow are two well known brands. I see that Omega also sells cartridge heaters. Omega also sells controllers to control the heaters. I have had good experience buying from Omega.
 
  • #3
TheFishyTiger said:
Hey there! I want to make a rosin press from scratch.
I have a big press with 2 inch thick metal plates, probably about 4 inches wide and 10 inches long.
I need to heat these plates up to 230 degrees Fahrenheit and press them against each other with product in between them.
Does your press look like the one in the photo below? Do all rosin presses use heated plates? How uniform does the temperature need to be across the face of the two plates?

http://rosinpressguru.com/wp-conten...recision-series-rosin-press-left-300x300.jpeg

tth-precision-series-rosin-press-left-300x300.jpg
 

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  • #4
Other possible cartridge heater sources are Tempco, IMS (Injection Molding Supply) and Dalton.

If possible, look around to see what others have done in terms of thermocouple placement, and heater wattage. My experience is in plastics, and it's a trade-off between bring the steel up to processing temperature quickly versus material degradation.
 
  • #5
! i know nothing about engineering or whatever; but would you not want to separate the heat from the piston of the press..I envision seals/fluid getting too hot from the heat transfer.

Is that what the green part is in the image above; a heat separator of sorts?
 
  • #6
nitsuj said:
Is that what the green part is in the image above; a heat separator of sorts?
The green is probably thermal insulation. You do need to reduce the heat loss from the plate.

Keep the hydraulics below the plates to reduce thermal transfer to hydraulics and to prevent contamination of the rosin with leaking oil.

See how others satisfy the requirements.
https://topbestreviewss.com/technology/top-best-rosin-press/
 

1. What is the most efficient way to heat up metal plates?

The most efficient way to heat up metal plates is by using an induction heating method. This involves placing the metal plates within an electromagnetic field, which creates a current in the metal and causes it to heat up quickly.

2. How long does it take to heat up metal plates using different methods?

The time it takes to heat up metal plates varies depending on the heating method used. Induction heating is the fastest method, typically taking only a few minutes. Other methods, such as convection or radiation heating, may take longer, ranging from 10-30 minutes.

3. Is it safe to heat up metal plates in a microwave?

No, it is not safe to heat up metal plates in a microwave. Microwaves use electromagnetic radiation to heat up food, but this radiation can cause sparks and damage to metal objects. It is best to avoid heating up metal plates in a microwave.

4. What temperature should metal plates be heated to?

The temperature at which you should heat up metal plates depends on the specific metal and its intended use. However, in general, most metal plates can be heated to temperatures between 300-500 degrees Fahrenheit for efficient heating.

5. Can metal plates be heated up multiple times?

Yes, metal plates can be heated up multiple times without causing any damage. However, it is important to allow the plates to cool down before reheating to prevent warping or other potential damage. It is also recommended to avoid excessive heating and cooling cycles to prolong the lifespan of the metal plates.

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