Mass spectroscopy and electromagnetic radiation

In summary, the conversation discusses the emission of electromagnetic radiation from accelerating charged particles, specifically in the context of mass spectrometry. It is mentioned that the Larmor formula can be used to calculate the intensity of the emitted radiation, and it is suggested that the radiation may be too weak to be detected with current instruments. The article referenced provides the formula for non-relativistic cases of this type of radiation.
  • #1

Borek

Mentor
28,920
4,206
Bear with me, I am a chemist :shy:

As far as I understand, every accelerating charge emits electromagnetic radiation.

In mass spectroscopy charged molecules/parts of molecules move in the magnetic field which bends their trajectories using Lorentz force. That means they are accelerated, yet I have never heard about them emitting the EM radiation. That would be not much different from cyclotron radiation.

Is it just a matter of the intensity and wavelength? Charged molecules in mass spectrometer are too slow and/or acceleration is to small for the radiation to be of any importance?
 
Physics news on Phys.org
  • #2
If you use the Larmor formula for emitted electromagnetic power from an accelerating charged particle, I expect it may be that the intensity of the light emitted is extremely small considering the velocities and magnetic fields used.
Barring that, I would look at the frequency spectrum of the emitted radiation to see if it is detectible with whatever instruments are being used. If the braking radiation were outside the visible spectrum, you would at least not be able to see it with your own eyes.
Unfortunately, my experience with mass spectrometers is nonexistent.
 
  • #3

1. What is mass spectroscopy and how does it work?

Mass spectroscopy is an analytical technique used to identify and quantify molecules based on their mass-to-charge ratio. It works by ionizing a sample, separating the ions based on their mass-to-charge ratio, and then detecting and measuring the abundance of each ion. This information can then be used to determine the molecular weight and structure of the sample.

2. What is electromagnetic radiation and how is it related to mass spectroscopy?

Electromagnetic radiation is a form of energy that includes visible light, radio waves, X-rays, and other types of radiation. It is related to mass spectroscopy because it is used to ionize the sample in the first step of the process. This allows for the separation and detection of ions in the mass spectrometer.

3. What are the different types of mass spectrometry?

There are several types of mass spectrometry, including time-of-flight, quadrupole, ion trap, and magnetic sector. Each type has its own advantages and applications, but they all follow the general principle of ionizing, separating, and detecting ions to determine the mass-to-charge ratio of a sample.

4. What are the applications of mass spectroscopy?

Mass spectroscopy has a wide range of applications in various fields such as chemistry, biology, environmental science, and forensics. It is used for drug discovery, protein identification, environmental monitoring, and identifying trace amounts of chemicals in complex mixtures.

5. What are the advantages of using mass spectroscopy over other analytical techniques?

Mass spectroscopy has several advantages over other analytical techniques, including high sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy. It can also analyze a wide range of compounds, from small molecules to large biomolecules. Additionally, it is a relatively fast and efficient technique, making it a valuable tool in many scientific fields.

Similar threads

Replies
11
Views
3K
Replies
29
Views
2K
  • Electromagnetism
Replies
16
Views
2K
  • Electromagnetism
Replies
2
Views
2K
Replies
7
Views
1K
Replies
17
Views
21K
Replies
13
Views
2K
  • Electromagnetism
2
Replies
41
Views
17K
  • Electromagnetism
2
Replies
51
Views
7K
  • STEM Academic Advising
Replies
4
Views
2K
Back
Top