Masters in EE: Accelerated vs Regular MS: Pros & Cons

In summary: I've been told that the employers are indifferent to the degree, so either way it sounds like it won't matter.
  • #1
DefaultName
180
0
how favorable is an accelerated ms/bs program sound to an employer, as compared to a regular 2-2.5 year MS? (finish my BS and MS in 5 years... start taking grad class in senior year)

also, I am thinking about going the MS-project/exam route, than a thesis. What do employers think of this generally?

Thanks.
 
Physics news on Phys.org
  • #2
MS is pretty short - you're overestimating the time it takes to get one. I can't think of a reason why BS/MS would be less regarded than MS nonthesis given the only difference is you double count courses for degree purposes.
 
  • #3
They probably dont care. A masters is a masters is a masters is a masters. If it took you 2 or 10 years. You are an application with a masters.

(NOTE, they will care what *kind of masters you have)
 
Last edited:
  • #4
Yes - that's what it is. You take graduate level courses in your senior year and it counts towards both your BS degree and your MS degree. The requirements are the same for the accelerated program and for the individual program.
 
  • #5
There is no difference between BS/MS and a separate MS, besides the age you will be when you finish. However, most schools I'm familiar with do not allow you to count any classes towards both your BS and MS. They will recognize that you've completed the relevant coursework, but you can't apply them as credits towards both degrees (the result being that you end up taking more graduate courses than a regular MS would, which is a good thing).

Also, I'd say that the project/exam route is preferred over the MS thesis, for the reason that you simply can't do enough research and publication in the course of doing an MS to write a worthwhile thesis. Many schools do not even offer the MS thesis option any more (or even the MS at all), as it is perceived to be a waste of professors' time to oversee short research projects that don't go anywhere. Don't let that stop you from doing a thesis if you decide you want to, but I don't think it will get you anywhere that the exam wouldn't.
 
  • #6
I've been considering the course option route... instead of the thesis/research route.
 

1. What is the difference between an accelerated and regular MS in EE?

An accelerated MS in EE is a program that allows students to complete their degree in a shorter amount of time, typically 1-2 years, by taking more classes per semester or during the summer. A regular MS in EE typically takes 2-3 years to complete and follows a traditional academic calendar.

2. What are the advantages of an accelerated MS in EE?

The main advantage of an accelerated MS in EE is that it allows students to complete their degree and enter the workforce or pursue further education sooner. This can be beneficial for those who are seeking to advance their career or have a time-sensitive opportunity. Additionally, an accelerated program may also save students money in tuition and living expenses.

3. What are the potential downsides of an accelerated MS in EE?

One potential downside of an accelerated MS in EE is the heavier course load, which can be challenging for some students to manage. This may also limit the time available for internships or research opportunities. Additionally, an accelerated program may not allow students to fully immerse themselves in their studies and may lead to a less well-rounded education.

4. What are the benefits of a regular MS in EE?

A regular MS in EE allows students to spread out their coursework and have a more manageable course load. This can be beneficial for those who are also working or have other commitments outside of school. Regular MS programs also typically offer more opportunities for research and internships, allowing students to gain practical experience and make valuable connections in their field.

5. Are there any disadvantages to a regular MS in EE?

One potential disadvantage of a regular MS in EE is the longer time commitment. This may delay entry into the workforce or further education. Additionally, a regular program may be more expensive in terms of tuition and living expenses. It may also be more difficult to balance coursework with other commitments, leading to a longer time to degree completion.

Similar threads

  • STEM Academic Advising
Replies
4
Views
885
  • STEM Academic Advising
Replies
2
Views
1K
  • STEM Academic Advising
Replies
6
Views
788
  • STEM Academic Advising
Replies
19
Views
5K
Replies
15
Views
2K
  • STEM Academic Advising
Replies
8
Views
1K
  • STEM Academic Advising
Replies
17
Views
1K
  • STEM Academic Advising
Replies
11
Views
2K
  • STEM Academic Advising
Replies
23
Views
2K
Replies
6
Views
1K
Back
Top