Maximum Angle of Safe Walking on Icy Surfaces

In summary, the discussion revolves around Jeremy trying to walk up an icy sidewalk. It is mentioned that he has leather shoes with a coefficient of friction of 0.3 on ice. The question is posed as to what is the steepest angle he can safely walk up with these shoes. The equations mentioned are Ff = μ(Fn), F = ma, and Fw = mg. The attempt at a solution involves drawing a free body diagram and calculating the steepest angle to be 16.7 degrees, and the coefficient of friction needed for a 65 degree hill to be 2.14.
  • #1
Intrusionv2
31
0

Homework Statement


Jeremy is trying to walk up an icy sidewalk. If he has leather shoes (coefficient of leather on ice = 0.3) then what is the steepest angle up which he can safely walk? What would have to be his coefficient of friction if the hill were 65 degrees?


Homework Equations



Ff = μ(Fn)
F = ma (?)
Fw = mg (?)

The Attempt at a Solution



No idea.
 
Physics news on Phys.org
  • #2
If he is walking up the steepest angle, he will just be on the verge of slipping, draw a free body diagram.

The second part is more of the same feast.
 
  • #3
Thanks! I got 16.7 degrees for steepest angle and 2.14 coefficient if 65 deg.
 

Related to Maximum Angle of Safe Walking on Icy Surfaces

1. What is friction?

Friction is the resistance between two surfaces that are in contact with each other. It is a force that opposes motion and is caused by microscopic irregularities on the surface of objects.

2. How does friction affect objects on a 65 degree hill?

Friction can have a significant impact on objects on a 65 degree hill. The steeper the hill, the greater the force of friction will be, which can slow down or even stop objects from sliding or rolling down the hill.

3. How does the type of surface affect friction on a 65 degree hill?

The type of surface can greatly affect the amount of friction on a 65 degree hill. Rough surfaces, such as gravel or sand, will have more friction than smooth surfaces, like a sheet of ice. This is because the irregularities on the surface can create more resistance.

4. Does friction only act in the opposite direction of motion?

No, friction can act in any direction depending on the orientation of the two surfaces in contact. For example, if an object is sliding down a 65 degree hill, the friction will act in the opposite direction of its motion. However, if the object is being pushed up the hill, friction will act in the same direction as the motion.

5. Can friction be beneficial on a 65 degree hill?

Yes, friction can be beneficial on a 65 degree hill in certain situations. For example, without friction, it would be very difficult for cars to drive up the hill as their tires would not have enough grip. Additionally, friction can help hikers and climbers to maintain their footing on steep inclines.

Similar threads

  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
2
Views
1K
  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
11
Views
2K
  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
2
Views
986
  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
2
Views
12K
Replies
4
Views
1K
  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
2
Replies
37
Views
6K
  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
7
Views
903
  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
4
Views
4K
  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
4
Views
1K
  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
3
Views
2K
Back
Top