Mechanical energy in an harmonic wave and in normal modes

In summary, mechanical energy in an harmonic wave refers to the total energy present in a wave caused by the oscillation of a mechanical system. It is a combination of kinetic and potential energy and remains constant as the wave oscillates. The amount of mechanical energy is directly related to the number of normal modes present and is affected by factors such as amplitude, frequency, and the properties of the mechanical system. It can also be converted into other forms of energy. The total mechanical energy can be calculated using the equation E = 1/2kA², taking into account the potential and kinetic energy in the system.
  • #1
crick
43
4
I think I miss something about energy of a mechanical wave.
In absence of dissipation the mechanical energy transported by an harmonic wave is constant.

$$E=\frac{1}{2} A^2 \omega^2 m$$

But, while studying normal modes on a rope, I find that the mechanical energy of a normal mode (still constant) is equal to

$$E=\frac{1}{4} A^2 \omega^2 m$$

Is the factor ##\frac{1}{2}## really present and why?
 
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  • #2
Are you sure the first formula is about a wave? What would be the meaning of m?
Isn't the energy of a harmonic oscillator?
 

Related to Mechanical energy in an harmonic wave and in normal modes

1. What is mechanical energy in an harmonic wave?

Mechanical energy in an harmonic wave refers to the total energy present in a wave that is caused by the oscillation of a mechanical system. This energy is a combination of both kinetic energy (energy of motion) and potential energy (energy stored in the system). In an harmonic wave, the total mechanical energy remains constant as the wave oscillates.

2. How is mechanical energy related to normal modes?

Normal modes are specific patterns of vibration that can occur in a mechanical system. The mechanical energy in an harmonic wave is directly related to the number of normal modes present in the system. As the number of normal modes increases, so does the mechanical energy of the wave.

3. What factors affect the amount of mechanical energy in an harmonic wave?

The amount of mechanical energy in an harmonic wave is affected by several factors, including the amplitude of the wave (how far it oscillates), the frequency of the wave (how quickly it oscillates), and the mass and stiffness of the mechanical system producing the wave.

4. Can mechanical energy in an harmonic wave be converted into other forms of energy?

Yes, mechanical energy in an harmonic wave can be converted into other forms of energy, such as thermal energy or sound energy. This can happen when the wave encounters resistance or is absorbed by another material.

5. How is mechanical energy calculated in an harmonic wave?

The total mechanical energy in an harmonic wave can be calculated using the equation E = 1/2kA², where E is the energy, k is the spring constant of the system, and A is the amplitude of the wave. This equation takes into account the potential energy stored in the system due to the spring's stiffness and the kinetic energy of the wave's motion.

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