1. Not finding help here? Sign up for a free 30min tutor trial with Chegg Tutors
    Dismiss Notice
Dismiss Notice
Join Physics Forums Today!
The friendliest, high quality science and math community on the planet! Everyone who loves science is here!

Quantum Modern Quantum Mechanics Sakurai

  1. Dec 28, 2015 #1
    What i'm going to need to learn from this book? i'm gonna need read something before?
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Dec 28, 2015 #2

    blue_leaf77

    User Avatar
    Science Advisor
    Homework Helper

    Based on personal experience, you need at least basic linear algebra, calculus, as well as introductory quantum mechanics. The book will assume that the reader is familiar with solving Schroedinger equations for some easy potentials, like potential well, harmonic oscillator, and hydrogen atom, for which reason you need calculus.
     
  4. Dec 28, 2015 #3

    jtbell

    User Avatar

    Staff: Mentor

    If you have a copy of the book handy, look at the introduction or preface. Textbook authors usually say there what they expect users of the book to know already.
     
  5. Dec 28, 2015 #4
    Hum ok, what introductory quantum mechanics book you recommend me?
     
  6. Dec 28, 2015 #5

    blue_leaf77

    User Avatar
    Science Advisor
    Homework Helper

  7. Dec 28, 2015 #6
    Thank you!!
     
  8. Dec 29, 2015 #7

    vanhees71

    User Avatar
    Science Advisor
    2016 Award

    I'd recommend precisely Sakurai's text. It was the book our professor used in your introductory quantum-mechanics lecture (QM 1) within the theory course, and it explains everything very well.
     
  9. Dec 29, 2015 #8
    Really?? so great! :D:D, some time before i've started learn from Griffith but i didn't like the book so much, but i survived until 3-D Schorodinger Equation, and i found that Sakurai's book could be better, because it's in a higher level! :)
     
  10. Dec 30, 2015 #9

    vanhees71

    User Avatar
    Science Advisor
    2016 Award

    I don't know Griffiths's book on quantum mechanics, but from the discussions here in the forum I get the impression that it is cometimes confusing for the students. Any good book on quantum mechanics is "high level", because quantum mechanics is a high-level subject!
     
  11. Dec 30, 2015 #10
    It's because this book it's in graduate level(Quantum Theory 1), so appears to be a lot more difficult haha, but appart from physics requeriments(analytic mechanics, solving of basic problems in schorodinger equation), what i will need in mathematics for this book?
     
  12. Dec 30, 2015 #11

    vanhees71

    User Avatar
    Science Advisor
    2016 Award

    I'd say the most important math you need to deal with quantum mechanics is linear algebra, vector analysis and some knowledge about functional analysis (theory of distributions) in Hilbert space. Concerning physics, you need classical mechanics in the Hamiltonian (phase-space) formulation with Poisson brackets. It's also good to have some knowledge about symmetries and Noether's theorem in classical mechanics, in terms of the Hamilton formulation and the relation to Lie algebras.
     
  13. Dec 30, 2015 #12
    ok, the mathematical part i should be ok.., but Hamiltonian formulation with Poisson brackets??, i have only seen Lagrange formulation.., where i should learn this thing??
     
  14. Dec 30, 2015 #13

    vanhees71

    User Avatar
    Science Advisor
    2016 Award

    You can take any textbook on analytical mechanics. I know more the German textbook literature. I know that the textbook by Scheck is translated. Searching at Amazon gives this, which should be it:

    https://www.amazon.com/Mechanics-Newtons-Deterministic-Graduate-Physics/dp/3642053696

    which is very good (the whole series by the way, covering the standard theory course at universities in a very modern way, but I'm not sure whether it's translated into English).
     
  15. Dec 30, 2015 #14
    Thank you so much for you patience, i will try this book right now, i'm being overwhelmed by so many difficult book right now(Jackson's Eletrodynamics, Treil's Linear Algebra Done Wrong), but i will try to get my way....
     
  16. Dec 30, 2015 #15
    Well, this book appears to be awesome, but i'm afraid that he needs a amout of analysis that i'm not sure that i can handle, can you tell me how 'much' analysis this book needs?
     
  17. Dec 31, 2015 #16

    vanhees71

    User Avatar
    Science Advisor
    2016 Award

    Hm, I'd say the usual 2nd-semester level of vector calculus should be sufficient.
     
Know someone interested in this topic? Share this thread via Reddit, Google+, Twitter, or Facebook

Have something to add?
Draft saved Draft deleted