Most effective means of moving hot air?

In summary, the best way to move hot air from a wood stove to other rooms is to use a fan to disperse the excess heat. It would be more efficient to push the air across the stove rather than sucking it away, as this would allow for better heat transfer and avoid overheating the fan. Another option would be to use a heat exchanger to distribute the hot air throughout the house. Convection can also be utilized by having the stove in the basement.
  • #1
jmeeter
2
0
What is the best way to move hot air? Would it be blowing air across the heat source (ex: wood stove) or suck the air away from the heat source?

I use a wood stove to heat my home which works perfectly, but it occasionally gets too hot in the living room (where the wood stove is). I want to disperse some of this excess heat into the other rooms.
 
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  • #2
Best way in terms of what? If you have already made the heat, then pretty much it stands to reason that a fan is really all you need, right? Are you possibly thinking of something else? It would help to know the layout of your home to find out just what is involved with moving air from one room to another.
 
  • #3
What I want to know is, is it better to blow the air across the wood stove or suck it away from the stove?
 
  • #4
Whichever way you do this you will effect the way the stove burns, your best bet (although it not my area so just an educated guess) would be to fit some kind of heat exchanger over the stove then have contained airflow through it vented into rooms or closed system like radiators piped through, this way the waste heat is used to heat the rest of the house and the burn rate of the stove dosn't change.
 
  • #5
Actually, the best way is to have it in the basement and allow convection to do it's thing. I can't remember what those older systems were called that did this.

IMO it is better to draw the hot air from the stove and duct it somewhere. Simply blowing over a hot surface does not allow the air a lot of residency time to pick up the heat.
 
  • #6
jmeeter said:
What I want to know is, is it better to blow the air across the wood stove or suck it away from the stove?
For reasons of heat transfer and avoiding overheating the fan, it is better to push air across the stove.
 

Related to Most effective means of moving hot air?

What is the most effective means of moving hot air?

The most effective means of moving hot air depends on the specific situation and needs. Some common methods include using fans, air conditioners, or natural ventilation through windows or doors.

How do fans move hot air?

Fans move hot air by circulating it with their blades, creating a breeze that helps to cool down the surrounding area. This is known as convection, where the hot air rises and is replaced by cooler air.

Are air conditioners the most effective way to move hot air?

In most cases, air conditioners are the most effective means of moving hot air. They use a refrigerant to absorb heat from the air and then release it outside, effectively cooling down the indoor space.

Can natural ventilation be just as effective as mechanical means of moving hot air?

Yes, in some cases, natural ventilation can be just as effective as mechanical means of moving hot air. This is especially true in areas with cooler climates or during the evening when the outside air is cooler.

What factors should be considered when determining the most effective means of moving hot air?

Some factors to consider include the size of the space, the temperature and humidity levels, the availability of power sources, and the cost and energy efficiency of different methods. It is also important to consider the specific needs and preferences of the individuals using the space.

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